October 14, 1985

WORLD/COVER

THE SPIES AND THEIR MASTERS

THE SPIES AND THEIR MASTERS 3637
WORLD/COVER

THE SPIES AND THEIR MASTERS

The high-level defections were a summer-long phenomenon, and for a change the most important traffic seemed to be westbound. One after another, in Athens, Rome and London, senior Soviet intelligence officers sought sanctuary in the capitalist world, apparently triggering an exodus of compromised West Germans as well as a series of diplomatic expulsions by Great Britain and the Soviet Union.
Terror at ground zero-in two states 4647
MIDDLE EAST

Terror at ground zero-in two states

Nestled amid palm and cypress trees, the Tunisian suburb of Hammam-Shatt was a quiet enclave of pastel-painted apartment buildings and villas south of the capital on the Gulf of Tunis. Then, on Tuesday, Oct. 1 at 10:15 a.m., the noisy approach of jetplanes shattered the suburban calm.
Sounding a Soviet challenge on arms 4445
FRANCE

Sounding a Soviet challenge on arms

The banquet was lavish and the dinner guests drawn from the cream of French society. In Paris’s elegant 18th-century Elysée Palace, home of French President François Mitterrand, Soviet Communist Party General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev rose to propose a toast.
Life in the slow lane 1415

Life in the slow lane

Since June, 1984, when he narrowly lost the fiercely contested campaign for the leadership of the Liberal party to John Turner, Jean Chrétien, the Liberal member from Shawinigan, has kept a low public profile. Now, Chrétien combines his role as opposition critic for external affairs with practising law one day a week in Toronto.
A counterspy's new ways 4041
COVER

A counterspy's new ways

Unlike the eccentric, plodding George Smiley in John le Carré’s spy novels or the dangerously high-flying M in Ian Fleming’s James Bond books, Thomas D’Arcy Finn seems to be a perfectly ordinary man. Finn is the director of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the new counterespionage agency that was created 15 months ago—amid political demands for civilian control—out of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
Moderate beginnings in the Yukon 2021

Moderate beginnings in the Yukon

In the Yukon politics is an intensely personal game played with small teams on a vast field covered with spruce trees and mountain peaks. Because of that, elections in the Yukon can be decided by a handful of voters in the territory’s 16 ridings.
Tools of the secrets trade 4243

Tools of the secrets trade

The umbrella gun fires a poison pellet that kills its victims within hours. The microphone implanted surgically in the chest monitors an agent’s every conversation. The camera as small as a cigarette lighter snaps pictures of unsuspecting subjects.
An island paradise up for sale 16f16g
DATELINE: CAMPOBELLO

An island paradise up for sale

The island is best-known for one of its former summer residents —U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. But Campobello is a small Canadian island less than a quarter of a mile off the coast of Maine, a wooded, windswept footprint of land where 1,490 inhabitants, many prosperous fishermen and their families, live in peaceful seclusion.
Getting into the Blue Jays’ act T617
COLUMN

Getting into the Blue Jays’ act

Pennant fever brings out the best in baseball players. Often it brings out the worst in the fans. Consider this vignette from a recent Toronto Blue Jays home game. Two are out in the third inning; the Blue Jays against the Boston Red Sox. The Blue Jays lead the American League East and the world.
Confronting the debt crisis 6263
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

Confronting the debt crisis

As roughly 9,000 international bankers and finance ministers—including Canada’s Michael Wilson—prepared to gather at the Seoul Hilton Hotel in South Korea this week, they faced the formidable issue of finding ways to lift the burden of a $950-billion (U.S.) debt load from the shoulders of the poorest nations on earth.
October 71985 October 211985