March 17, 1986

SPECIAL REPORT/EXPO 86

A BILLION-DO LLAR PARTY

SPECIAL REPORT/EXPO 86

THE GRAND DESIGN OF A WORLD'S FAIR

SPECIAL REPORT/EXPO 86

PAVILIONS OF PROMISE: THE BEST OF EXPO 86

A BILLION-DO LLAR PARTY 1415
SPECIAL REPORT/EXPO 86

A BILLION-DO LLAR PARTY

Vancouver—Narcissus-on-the-Pacific, the village on the edge of the rain forest, shimmering in its own beauty—is a city both boastful and insecure. Its braggering and swaggering attitude toward strangers infuriates the remainder of Canada, which must endure the fact that this port, thanks to the Japan Current, does not possess winters.
THE GRAND DESIGN OF A WORLD'S FAIR 1617
SPECIAL REPORT/EXPO 86

THE GRAND DESIGN OF A WORLD'S FAIR

At 10 a.m. on May 2 British Columbia will launch the biggest party in its history, the $1.5-billion transportation and communications fair known as Expo 86. The signs of the extravaganza on the shores of False Creek in Vancouver are everywhere, from the stylized blue number 86 that hangs from white banners on downtown buildings to Expo 86 logos emblazoned on the funnels of B.C. ferries.
PAVILIONS OF PROMISE: THE BEST OF EXPO 86 2425
SPECIAL REPORT/EXPO 86

PAVILIONS OF PROMISE: THE BEST OF EXPO 86

Czechoslovakian film technician Bohumil Mika has travelled the world as a representative of Art Centrum, a state agency that hires out its skilled employees to foreign clients. Art Centrum workers have been in demand since Czech pavilions became crowd favorites at the Brussel’s World Fair in 1958 and again at Expo 67 in Montreal.
Attacking the greenback 5657
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

Attacking the greenback

It was a landmark solution to a perplexing and far-reaching problem—the stubborn strength of the American dollar. When officials from the top five industrial nations, the Group of Five (G5), met in a New York hotel suite last September, they all expressed concern that the dollar was not responding fast enough to Washington’s efforts to lower its value.
The strategy sweep 4041
CANADA

The strategy sweep

Stretched out on the bed in his Regina hotel room, John Barber, president of the Saskatchewan Conservative party, nursed a rye and water and began talking about Prime Minister Brian Mulroney. While two cowboy-booted cattlemen who had come to discuss livestock issues nodded in agreement, Barber suggested—jokingly—that the purpose of Mulroney’s trip to Western Canada last week was to be with his wife, Mila.
Manitoba’s test of wills 3839
CANADA

Manitoba’s test of wills

Two years ago the political standing of Manitoba’s New Democratic Party government was critically low. An undertaking by Premier Howard Pawley to guarantee French language rights in the provincial constitution and expand services to francophones led to massive public protests, forcing him to backtrack.
Altering the contours of society 60B61
JUSTICE

Altering the contours of society

The announcement was the latest development in a legal drama that has been unfolding since the Queen proclaimed the Canadian Constitution Act in April, 1982, and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms became law. Last week Justice Minister John Crosbie unveiled his government’s long-awaited measures to eliminate inequality in Canada.
THE CANADIAN CONTINGENT 3031
SPECIAL REPORT/EXPO 86

THE CANADIAN CONTINGENT

The federal government’s Expo 86 pavilion at Canada Place is one of the largest pavilions ever built at a world exposition—more than 120,000 square feet and equal in size to five of the major corporate pavilions that proved to be the most popular attractions at Expo 85 in Tsukuba, Japan.
A WORLD OF PERFORMANCE 3233
SPECIAL REPORT/EXPO 86

A WORLD OF PERFORMANCE

The Eiffel Tower still stands as the landmark of the 1889 Paris Universal Exposition. But at the time, Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show stole the show. Since then, each world’s fair has endeavored to outdo its predecessors with startling and diverse entertainment.
Things that go bump in the nation 8081
GUEST COLUMN

Things that go bump in the nation

There had been rumors of strange goings-on for some time, but nobody took them seriously until they reached the government, which is constitutionally empowered to take anything it chooses seriously, including itself, which is only fair since nobody else does.
Why the nation laughed 12d13
COLUMN

Why the nation laughed

Her husband listened patiently and sympathetically on the telephone as she poured out her tale of woe in the workplace. He wanted to say something that would help. “Listen,” he said at last. “I have something that will cheer you up.” “What’s that?” she sniffed.
March 101986 March 241986