May 12, 1986

The fear of nuclear chaos 2627
WORLD/COVER

The fear of nuclear chaos

The first hint of a nuclear nightmare reached Scandinavia on a southeast wind. Suddenly, Swedish monitoring devices began to detect abnormally high levels of radiation, and when officials could find no leaks at their own nuclear power plants, they looked in the direction of the prevailing breezes—toward the Soviet Union.

EXPO'S ROYAL DEBUT 1011
CANADA/SPECIAL REPORT

EXPO'S ROYAL DEBUT

True to Vancouver’s reputation, it rained. The predicted crowds— although the first arrivals came early—were slow to gather. The monorail stalled for 20 minutes. But in the end, and after months of political controversy, the opening of Expo 86 last week—attended by 107,100—was a royal triumph of fanfares and dancing, fireworks and applause.
GUARDING AGAINST DISASTER 3233
COVER

GUARDING AGAINST DISASTER

On the wall of the windowless downtown Toronto office, a map of southern Ontario shows vivid purple circles around each of the province’s five nuclear power plants. The 10-km radius of each circle is significant: it marks the limits of the areas designated for evacuation if a reactor begins leaking radiation.
America’s divided Democrats 3839
WORLD

America’s divided Democrats

The rhetoric resembled that given after a standard rightwing Republican dinner. In a speech at New York’s Hofstra University last month, Charles Robb, the recently retired governor of Virginia, told his audience that it was time to “end the conspiracy of silence” and start a frank public debate on “self-defeating patterns of behavior” among U.S. blacks.
GOING TO THE WORLD'S FAIR 1415
SPECIAL REPORT

GOING TO THE WORLD'S FAIR

As her great-great-great-grandson mounted a dais to address a crowd of 10,000 gathered on the lawn of the British Columbia legislature, Queen Victoria faced squarely in the opposite direction, staring over the inner harbor of the city that bears her name.
The sweet smell of success 4647
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

The sweet smell of success

Barbra Streisand and Michael Jackson use it. So do Sylvester Stallone and Jacqueline Bisset. At Bloomingdale’s department store in New York, it is the number 1 seller. Floral, feminine, pricey and exclusive, it is relentlessly promoted to millions of other North Americans and Europeans as “the best-selling fragrance in Beverly Hills.”
Everybody into the pool T29
COLUMN

Everybody into the pool

The office is a bit slower to get down to work in the morning during the season of the hockey playoffs. First the statistics on the sports pages have to be checked. At the office, people have joined hockey pools. The goals and assists of the players they draft take on greaterthan-usual importance, because they earn money, not only for the players but for the people who “own” them.
Stoking up a burning debate 6465
GUEST COLUMN

Stoking up a burning debate

When it comes to perfecting the ancient art of counterproduction, the boycott of Air Canada by our four major cigarette manufacturers is right up there with Kurt Waldheim’s serialized war memories and the Reverend Jimmy Jones’s last revival meeting in Guyana.
Struggling to survive in the East 4848a
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

Struggling to survive in the East

The bottle holds half a cup of a thin brown liquid. When Peter Outhit, president of Halifaxbased Nova Scotia Resources Ltd. (NSRL), holds the container to the light, the fluid shows a greenish tinge. “Smell it,” he says. “You could put it in your car.”
Reforming apartheid 8b8C
Q&A: GLENN BABB

Reforming apartheid

Since assuming his position as South Africa's ambassador to Canada last August, Glenn Babb has encountered fierce public protests over his government's treatment of black unrest. The soft-spoken 42-year-old career diplomat, who has previously served in the South African-administered territory of Namibia, has complained that his message—that apartheid is dying—is often overlooked amid international condemnation of white rule and increasing political unrest among South African blacks.
May 51986 May 191986