June 16, 1986

A WELCOME MAT FROM CANADA 3839
COVER

A WELCOME MAT FROM CANADA

Semimythical Canada, that cold, wild land of moose and Mounties, remains lodged in the minds of some Americans. At least that is what many Canadian tourism officials say. As a result, Ottawa is spending $15 million this year on advertising designed to amend that myth, to convince Americans that “The World Next Door” is also sophisticated and swinging—even sexy— and, best of all, that it is the home of a spectacular party by the Pacific, Expo 86.
A PANORAMA OF PLEASURES 4445
COVER

A PANORAMA OF PLEASURES

The B.C. Pavilion’s patrons line up in a manmade forest that includes 40-foot cedars, planted especially for the fair. The pavilion’s attractions include a fastmoving film about the province’s natural wonders, not recommended for those who suffer from motion sickness.
The pitch of the oil firms’ optimist 28d29
BUSINESS WATCH

The pitch of the oil firms’ optimist

W e're living through one of the greatest periods of oppor tunity we've ever experi enced-but we won't know it until we've passed through and are looking back on what's been happening." That verdict, from James Gray, executive vice-president of Canadian Hunter Ex ploration Ltd.
A formidable political family 1213

A formidable political family

In her comfortable Charlottetown home, Eileen McMillan looks back and recalls the childhood of her precocious, somewhat sickly, set of twins, Tom and Charles. “I would have sold them for 25 cents at times when they were bad little boys,” she says.
Lifting an iron veil 2627
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

Lifting an iron veil

The stately banks that line Zurich’s prestigious business strip, the Bahnhofstrasse, are renowned for their financial soundness, their towering international status —and their secrecy. For decades Switzerland has assured depositors that a numbered account in the nation’s banks guaranteed privacy.
Solidarity in shadow 1819
WORLD

Solidarity in shadow

For millions of Poles he was a legend, the man who had evaded capture since Polish leader Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski declared martial law in December, 1981, and ended a groundswell of popular unrest that swept the country five years ago. But on Saturday, May 31, Polish authorities finally arrested Zbigniew Bujak, a leader of the banned trade union Solidarity, the leader of Poland’s underground political opposition and the country’s most-wanted fugitive.
GLOBAL NOTES 2223

GLOBAL NOTES

During the civil unrest that led to the overthrow of Chilean President Salvador Allende 13 years ago, a general strike by the nation’s truckers nearly paralysed the country. Now, the truckers are again preparing to 0 bring pressure to bear on the 1 government.
Avoiding a trade war 1011
CANADA

Avoiding a trade war

The request was an extraordinary departure from foreign service procedure. In his black diplomat’s suit and his black, chauffeured diplomat’s car, Canadian ambassador Allan Gotlieb set out one morning last week for an appointment with U.S. Commerce Secretary Malcolm Baldrige.
The high price of Irish charm 5657
COLUMN

The high price of Irish charm

Almost no one notices Brian Mulroney’s dilemma. Brian Mulroney, mind you, has many dilemmas, the basic one being that he was born Irish. Which means that he wants to be loved—an Irish weakness along with moodiness, a quick temper, a gift of the gab and an excess of charm that makes that particular race so fascinating and so infuriating.
An honorable defeat for Canada 3435
SPORTS

An honorable defeat for Canada

The homemade banner fluttering in the stifling air of Mexico City proclaimed: “The World Cupcircus for the poor.” It was a bitter commentary on the staging of the extravagant global soccer tournament in a nation suffering 17-per-cent unemployment, 75-per-cent inflation and a draining foreign debt of almost $100 billion.
June 91986 June 231986