June 30, 1986

WHY THE BOSS STEALS 2223
COVER/BUSINESS

WHY THE BOSS STEALS

It was a gamble that captivated the imagination of the Canadian public. On April 26, 1982, Brian Molony, assistant manager of a downtown Toronto branch of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, lost $1.4 million in six hours at an Atlantic City casino.
The Golden Bear’s race for the Open 4445
SPORTS

The Golden Bear’s race for the Open

Lining the lush fairways and ringing the treacherous greens of the Glen Abbey Golf Club in Oakville, Ont., tens of thousands of golf fans will jostle for position this week to catch a glimpse of the greatest player in the history of golf. He will be just one of 152 golfers trying for the 77th Canadian Open championship, the du Maurier Trophy, and the winner’s cheque of $153,000.
THE NEW CRIME SLEUTHS 2627
COVER

THE NEW CRIME SLEUTHS

It was a scene from the pastel-and-pistols world of Miami Vice. Two conservation officers and their prize witness strode into a Northern Ontario home, carrying a court order. While the officers searched through documents, a woman resident pulled out a revolver from a collection of restricted weapons in a bedroom closet and confronted them.
EXPOSING CORPORATE NEGLIGENCE 2829
COVER

EXPOSING CORPORATE NEGLIGENCE

The tragic accident was officially described as the result of a massive bureaucratic breakdown. But for many critics of the recent space shuttle disaster, the fatal explosion revealed a fundamental—perhaps even criminal—weakness in business ethics.
Reaching the boiling point 89
CANADA

Reaching the boiling point

She was two months pregnant— and hemorrhaging. But when 35-year-old Theresa Black rushed to Ajax-Pickering Hospital last week, she found its emergency ward closed—the result of a rotating strike by Ontario doctors. Then, a staff member in her family physician’s office advised her to drive to Whitby, 15 km away, for treatment.
Pretoria’s iron grip 1415
WORLD

Pretoria’s iron grip

The silence of South Africa was heard around the world last week. Shortly after midnight on the 10th anniversary of the landmark black Soweto uprising, the government imposed severe restrictions on the press—and appointed its Bureau for Information as the only source of official news about anti-apartheid disturbances.
A new bid for freedom 3839
JUSTICE

A new bid for freedom

Aftergraduating from high school with a straight-A average in 1982, Bruce Curtis says that he expected to attend Dalhousie University in Halifax that fall. But for the past four years the quiet 22-year-old from Middleton, N.S., has worn an ill-fitting prison uniform while serving a 20-year sentence for his involvement in two New Jersey killings.
Missing the news on a crisis 6d7
COLUMN

Missing the news on a crisis

A little known, under reported but seminal event took place recently. It was the second annual Canadian Steel Trade Conference held in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., last month. The meeting of corporate and labor leaders was remarkable because it shows what can be done when both sides identify problems that are too big for the bargaining table, and have enough confidence in themselves and each other to set about finding solutions to ensure their mutual survival.
The prudes are in full swing 5253
COLUMN

The prudes are in full swing

So here we go again. The Grundys are loose again, on both sides of the border. The prudes of politics are in full swing, hitching their skirts up as they sprint into the past, their prim mouths pursed in self-righteousness. In Ottawa, there is the unlikely figure of John Crosbie, vowing to return his nation to the values of the 1940s—or beyond.
GLOBAL NOTES 1819
WORLD

GLOBAL NOTES

For two days last October four Palestinian terrorists held the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro hostage off the Egyptian coast. The assailants shot an elderly American passenger, Leon Klinghoffer, and forced other passengers to throw his body overboard before surrendering to Egyptian authorities in a controversial exchange for safe passage.
June 231986 July 71986