December 15, 1986

WARFARE IN TOYLAND 3839
COVER

WARFARE IN TOYLAND

Adults do not always delight in the sound of play, especially when children are duelling with plastic models of Soviet assault rifles or Israeli submachine-guns. But children are usually untroubled by the adult debate over the availability of war toys—they get more upset when an opponent refuses to fall down in the path of an imaginary bullet in the heat of mock battle.
Weapons of last resort 2223
WORLD

Weapons of last resort

Extending south from Samarra in mid-Iraq, the highway forks right after about five kilometres and continues 30 kilometres to the Iraqi State Establishment for the Production of Pesticides, SEPP. Surrounded by a double perimeter fence, the 10-square-mile facility is heavily guarded by troops and SAM 2 missiles.
A president under siege 2021
WORLD

A president under siege

The change in tone was swift and dramatic. Only days before, President Ronald Reagan had responded with anger and defiance to the worst crisis of his sixyear presidency, blaming the media for the outcry over the diversion of profits from secret Iranian arms sales to the Nicaraguan contra rebels.
PWA heats up the war 3233
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

PWA heats up the war

In the summer of 1946 bush pilot Russell Baker launched a tiny airline in Fort St. James, B.C., a hamlet located on Stuart Lake, 650 km northeast of Vancouver. His first job was flying forest-fire patrols for the provincial government in war-surplus Cessna Cranes.
HOT NEW GIFTS FOR ADULTS 4647
COVER

HOT NEW GIFTS FOR ADULTS

It is a comfortable, old-fashioned image—piles of brightly wrapped packages under the boughs of the tree on Christmas morning. But the tradition ends there, considering the kinds of presents being bought for adults this year. Gadgetry— often expensive and frivolous—plays a large part in many retailers’ Christmas gift offerings.
SPELLBINDING GIFTS TO LAST 4445
COVER

SPELLBINDING GIFTS TO LAST

There is always a risk involved in giving children books for Christmas: the young recipients may declare firmly that they would rather have toys. Still, a good book—a really good book—can compete successfully for a child’s attention against the flashier charms of a mock laser gun or the latest vigilante doll.
Turner faces the future 1011
CANADA

Turner faces the future

The lively music, red wine and five-course Italian meal probably helped. But they were not the only reasons the 275 Liberals from Toronto’s York West riding were in high spirits last week. They had gathered in the Galaxy Banquet Hall to celebrate the resounding victory of their leader, John Turner.
BIG STORES, BIGGER SAIES 4243
COVER

BIG STORES, BIGGER SAIES

It is a commercial variation of a child’s garden of delights: toys stretching into the distance. Customers push shopping carts up and down aisles jammed with dolls and puzzles, rattles and plastic submachine-guns. Dozens of employees dressed in orange pin-striped jackets busily restock the beige metal shelves or tend up to 20 cash registers.
Stalin’s war against the peasants 5657
THE ARTS

Stalin’s war against the peasants

Tilling the black loam of the steppe, they were among the most gifted farmers the world has known. But the prosperity of the Soviet Union’s 30 million Ukrainians was to dictator Josef Stalin a kind of heresy. In Harvest of Sorrow, British scholar Robert Conquest produces exhaustive documentation to show that the price the peasants of Little Russia paid for their affront was murderously high.
Getting it together at the Games 5051
SPORTS

Getting it together at the Games

It was the kickoff event to more than a year of pre-Olympic festivities. But when only 3,000 spectators— including 1,500 bused-in schoolchildren—turned out last month to watch two days of world-class ski jumping at Calgary’s new $60-million Canada Olympic Park, the city’s Olympics Organizing Committee (OCO ’88), quickly got the message.
December 81986 December 221986