June 22, 1987

CRACKDOWN ON SMOKING 2425
COVER

CRACKDOWN ON SMOKING

When Dr. Luther Leonidas Terry of Red Level, Ala., died on March 29, 1985, at 73, millions of people regarded him as a full-blown American hero. Others, notably those working in the tobacco industry, viewed him somewhat differently. As surgeon general of the U.S. public health service, Terry was responsible for a bombshell government book that declared flatly that cigarette smoking caused lung cancer and increased the risk of heart disease.
Galbraith’s vision 88a
Q&A: JOHN KENNETH GALBRAITH

Galbraith’s vision

Economist John Kenneth Galbraith has enjoyed a varied career. He has taught at the University of California at Berkeley, Princeton University and Harvard, where he retired from full-time lecturing to become the Paul M. Warburg Professor of Economics Emeritus in 1975.
KICKING A HABIT 2829
COVER

KICKING A HABIT

In 1983 Maureen O’Sullivan, a stylish, middle-aged Fredericton woman, decided to quit smoking. She doggedly followed the instructions of her stop-smoking clinic leader, restricting her smoking to fewer and fewer locations during the six-week course until she only indulged her habit in one place: her kitchen.
THE GROWERS' DESPAIR 3031
COVER

THE GROWERS' DESPAIR

Albert Honkoop says that he has always taken great pride in looking out the kitchen window of his farmhouse in Alliston, P.E.I., and admiring the summer fields of tall, green, shining tobacco. He adds that it had always been his dream to have a farm for his children to inherit after he retired.
Challenge from Berlin 1617
WORLD

Challenge from Berlin

Rarely has the former actor had a more carefully selected set, or one richer in symbolism. As President Ronald Reagan stood on the speaker’s platform in West Berlin on Friday, June 12, the columns of the Brandenburg Gate rose behind him, a past monument to German unity.
An Atlantic Beginning? 1011
CANADA

An Atlantic Beginning?

As a businessman based in the town of Springdale on the northern coast of Newfoundland, Job Halfyard is familiar with bureaucracy. Since he went into business for himself in 1972, the former high-school teacher has often been frustrated by delays and red tape.
Vagueness in Venice 3435
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

Vagueness in Venice

Over an elegant dinner of coquille St. Jacques, gnocchi and lamb ribs in Venice’s opulent 18th-century Palazzo Grassi, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney made his case. Before the annual summit meeting of leaders from the United States, Japan, West Germany, Britain, France, Canada and Italy, Mulroney knew that West Germany was most strongly opposed to Canadian initiatives on South Africa and agricultural subsidies.
Stratford’s cavalcade 5455
THEATRE

Stratford’s cavalcade

The Stratford Festival in southwestern Ontario turns 35 this year, and its survival must be counted no less than a miracle. In a region where entertainment usually runs to drive-ins and agricultural fairs, Stratford has boldly based its repertoire almost exclusively on the classics.
On the stump with the Iron Lady 8j9
COLUMN

On the stump with the Iron Lady

When the call came from the London Times to cover Margaret Thatcher on part of her campaign, I got very excited and rushed to my bookshelves to bone up on economist Friedrich Hayek. Then I rushed to my wardrobe to get out the tweed and pearls. There may be a woman in history whom I admire as much as Thatcher, I thought, but one does not easily come to mind.
A challenge to big-city dailies 4445
MEDIA WATCH

A challenge to big-city dailies

The Royal Commission on Newspapers, also known as the Kent commission, reported with dark foreboding on July 1, 1981, that “concentration engulfs Canadian daily newspaper publishing” and that “the years ahead will see more, unless the law is changed.”
June 151987 June 291987