November 30, 1987

WORLD/COVER

What the President should have known

WORLD/COVER

THE ORIENTAL DILEMMA

WORLD/COVER

JAPAN INC.’S NEW FACE

What the President should have known 3435
WORLD/COVER

What the President should have known

It had all the hallmarks of an unusual literary event. A bitter prepublication fight among the book’s 26 coauthors had resulted in 35 rewrites—and much advance publicity. The public’s appetite had already been whetted by a television series, which was the basis of the book, running through most of the summer months.
THE ORIENTAL DILEMMA 2627
WORLD/COVER

THE ORIENTAL DILEMMA

Inside Tokyo’s Imperial Palace, a fairy-tale castle with soaring medieval ramparts and swan-dotted moats, the emperor of Japan lay ill. At 86, Hirohito, who by tradition is regarded as a direct descendant of the Sun Goddess, had undergone major surgery, and the nation’s attention was riveted upon him.
JAPAN INC.’S NEW FACE 2223
WORLD/COVER

JAPAN INC.’S NEW FACE

They are on a worldwide spending spree. Last week the giant Japanese electronics company Sony Corp. bought the record division of New York-based CBS Inc. for a breathtaking $2.6 billion—and acquired the rights to Bruce Springsteen’s recordings.
A temporary workforce 4849
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

A temporary workforce

When the crippling recession of 1982 rolled across Canada, it cleared the path for a new growth industry. Companies had to provide expensive layoff and career-counselling packages for thousands of redundant workers—from janitors to senior managers.
AN EMPEROR AND A GENTLEMAN 3233
WORLD/COVER

AN EMPEROR AND A GENTLEMAN

To the world outside, Japan's emperor is a paradox-a shy, be spectacled and harmless-looking old man, who still stirs bitter memories of jungle battles and prison camp horrors during the Second World War. To the Japanese themselves, he symbolizes their very nationhood.
A hint of election fever 1213
CANADA

A hint of election fever

In everything but name, it was an election campaign tour. On a gruelling three-day swing through Atlantic Canada and into his Quebec riding of Manicouagan last week, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney entered a tumultuous evening event with loudspeakers blaring the hit song Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now.
Charges of racism 1415
CANADA

Charges of racism

By most accounts, Anthony Griffin was an unlikely candidate for martyrdom. Until he was killed by a police bullet in Montreal on Nov. 11, the troubled black 19year-old had spent the last year of his life in and out of court on a variety of minor charges, ranging from breaking and entering to breach of probation.
The Peter Mansbridge syndrome 5253
ANOTHER VIEW

The Peter Mansbridge syndrome

The front pages of the nation all looked the same. One after another told the identical story. In spaces usually occupied by cabinet shuffles, bus plunges and rumors of royal divorce, there was Peter Mansbridge of the CBC. What spectacularly newsworthy page-1 kind of thing had Peter Mansbridge of the CBC done? He had decided to stay in Canada.
Taking the tobacco war too far T211
COLUMN

Taking the tobacco war too far

As a smoker myself, I cannot dispute the fact that it is sheer folly to indulge in the habit. Anyone with half a brain now knows that smoking threatens one’s health. It is a dirty, filthy habit that costs a bundle. For two decades tobacco taxes have continued to outpace the rate of inflation, reaping a windfall for governments along with booze and other “sin” taxes.
PASSAGES 45
PASSAGES

PASSAGES

DIED: Legendary newsman Gillis (GP) Purcell, 82, a 41-year veteran of The Canadian Press and the general manager of the national news-gathering cooperative for 24 years until he retired in 1969; of pneumonia, in a Toronto hospital, where he had been since he suffered a stroke on Sept. 14 (editorial, page 2).
November 231987 December 71987