December 28, 1987

LETTERS 45

LETTERS

Before reading “The transplant revolution” (Cover, Nov. 23), I had been revolted by the thought of donating my organs. I was not aware of the shortage of donors and the possibility that I could save a life some day. Since my eyes were opened to the need out there, I have signed my licence and eliminated my selfish attitude.
Serving up a new slice of news 1010a
COLUMN

Serving up a new slice of news

It is hard to imagine it now, but it was not long ago that a story about a Canadian scientist would contain not a single reference to his favorite sandwich. But as Nobel Prize-winning chemist John C. Polanyi found out this year, all that is changing.
Toward the final hurdles 3637
CANADA

Toward the final hurdles

As the provincial premiers left their lunch meeting with Prime Minister Brian Mulroney in Ottawa last week, Donald Getty of Alberta and Joseph Ghiz of Prince Edward Island found themselves walking together down the front steps of the government guesthouse where they had convened.
Music for repressed Scotsmen 5253
COLUMN

Music for repressed Scotsmen

All of us have our aberrations. All of us do strange things—hopefully only once a year. It would be strange if we did not. Cleans out the inhibitions. Loosens the juices. Everybody to their own outlet. My annual kinkiness is exceedingly strange.
Wall Street’s gutter ethics 4647
BUSINESS WATCH

Wall Street’s gutter ethics

Wall Street is less a place than a metaphor. As the world’s leading financial centre, the seven-block alley of skyscrapers on the seaward tip of Manhattan Island determines the price of money. But in recent years it has also determined America’s ethical standards—or rather, the lack of them.
Roh’s bloody victory 4041
WORLD

Roh’s bloody victory

During the campaign for South Korea’s presidential elections, former army general Roh Tae-woo projected the soothing image of a father figure. Associates said that he drank one beer a day and liked the sentimental Latin love ballad Besame Mucho (Kiss Me A Lot).
Returning to the air 4849
TRANSPORTATION

Returning to the air

The agreement brought welcome relief to air travellers. After more than 20 days of cancelled travel plans and long lineups at other airlines, Air Canada reached a settlement last week in a bitter labor dispute with 8,500 locked-out ground workers.
1987 THE HONOR ROLL 10d11

1987 THE HONOR ROLL

By chance, there are minor similarities among some of the people on the annual Maclean's Honor Roll for 1987. Brian Orser and Wayne Gretzky, for their different purposes, both perform on skates. Maureen Forrester and Ofra Harnoy make music in the lower registers—Forrester with her rich contralto voice, Harnoy on her vibrant cello.
The return of Gary Hart 4242a
WORLD

The return of Gary Hart

He has no money, no headquarters and no staff. But last Tuesday, standing outside the state house at Concord, N.H., Gary Hart declared that he was “back in the race” for the Democratic presidential nomination. Seven months after his withdrawal from the campaign in a scandal over his liaison with Miami model Donna Rice, the 51-year-old former Colorado senator said that he was taking his campaign directly to the American people.
A Superstar’s Amazing Year 1415
HONOR ROLL

A Superstar’s Amazing Year

In a decade when public heroes rise and fall under the pressures of popular acclaim, few have maintained supremacy in any field as completely as Wayne Gretzky has in hockey. From the time that he turned professional as a stripling of 17 in 1978—first with Indianapolis and then Edmonton in the World Hockey Association’s final season—Gretzky began to earn his popular alias, “The Great One.”
December 211987 January 41988