February 15, 1988

CANADA

New trials for Mulroney

BUSINESS/ECONOMY

Campeau strikes again

OLYMPIC GUIDE 3435
COVER

OLYMPIC GUIDE

There will be no shortage of Olympic broadcast images. ABC TV will be on the air from noon to midnight on weekends and from 8 p.m. to midnight EST during weekdays. CBC radio will provide coverage for almost three hours a day. CBC TV will offer a prime-time evening highlights package.
New trials for Mulroney 1213
CANADA

New trials for Mulroney

It was just the kind of reception that Brian Mulroney needed. Facing a political storm in Ottawa over his decision last week to fire Michel Côté as minister of supply and services, the Prime Minister flew to Saint John, N.B., on Feb. 4 to visit a shipyard that had just received $2.7 billion in federal contracts to build frigates for the navy.
Campeau strikes again 4243
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

Campeau strikes again

Armed with a Grade 8 education and an itch to get ahead in the world, Robert Campeau went to work at the age of 15. His first job—sweeping floors at an Inco Ltd. smelter in his home town of Sudbury, Ont.—paid 57 cents an hour. Now 63, and nowhere near retirement, Campeau lives in an 11,000-square-foot home in Toronto and runs a multi-billion-dollar real estate and retail empire, Campeau Corp., from offices in Toronto and Manhattan.
HOW A COW TOWN GREW UP 2829
COVER

HOW A COW TOWN GREW UP

In the early 1980s, when their city’s economy was booming, Calgarians jokingly adopted the “sky crane” as their official bird. The construction cranes soared from dozens of building sites in the city during the energy boom that ended when oil prices nose-dived in 1983.
A three-year diplomatic balancing act 89
Q&A: STEPHEN LEWIS

A three-year diplomatic balancing act

On Oct. 5, 1984, former Ontario New Democratic Party leader Stephen Lewis astonished many Canadians by accepting the post of ambassador to the United Nations from the federal Conservatives. Since then, observers have generally agreed that the appointment was one of Prime Minister Brian Mulroney’s best.
'THE LAND OF BEGINNING AGAIN' 2425
THE WINTER GAMES/COVER

'THE LAND OF BEGINNING AGAIN'

It is a naked city, relatively treeless as prairie cities are. It spills from Nose Hill, once the site of frontier brothels, across the valleys of the Bow and Elbow rivers south, beyond the grain elevators at Midnapore, where the city’s first millionaire, meat-packer Pat Burns, had his ranch.
CALGARY’S TOP HAND 3233
COVER

CALGARY’S TOP HAND

Calgary newsman Ralph Klein was not joking in 1980 when he gave his CFCN TV newsroom colleagues the scoop that he intended to contest the coming Calgary mayoralty election. Exercising their news judgment, the co-workers did not take him seriously.
Primary protectionism 1819
WORLD

Primary protectionism

The setting recalled a time when the world was a simpler place. In the drafty repair shed of the Boone and Scenic Valley railway station, a whistle-stop 50km northwest of Des Moines, Iowa, Democrat Representative Richard Gephardt of Missouri, campaigning for his party’s presidential nomination, stood in front of an ancient yellow locomotive, which had become a museum piece.
CALGARY WELCOMES THE WORLD 2627
COVER

CALGARY WELCOMES THE WORLD

It was December, 1978. Some 911 cult members, drinking poisoned Kool-Aid, had just committed mass suicide in Jonestown, Guyana. Political experts were predicting that Pierre Trudeau could not win the next election. The Crazy Ca nucks were kings of the mountain, taking first and second in a downhill race in Austria.
Chipping away at B.C.’s giants T611
COLUMN

Chipping away at B.C.’s giants

When Peter Lougheed became Alberta’s premier in 1971 the province had a wealth of oil resources. But a few foreign-owned multinational companies smugly sat on all the best drilling sites—leased to them by the government, which owns mineral rights to 80 per cent of Alberta’s land.
February 81988 February 221988