May 1, 1995

COVER

WAKEUP CALL

SPECIAL REPORT

VICTORY IN EUROPE

COLUMN

A great time for Canadians abroad

WAKEUP CALL 2627
COVER

WAKEUP CALL

A P.E.I. bomb baffles police
VICTORY IN EUROPE 5455
SPECIAL REPORT

VICTORY IN EUROPE

CANADIANS PAID A BIG PRICE IN THE FINAL CAMPAIGN TO DEFEAT HITLER'S GERMANY
A great time for Canadians abroad 89
COLUMN

A great time for Canadians abroad

There has been a mini-boomlet for our team this past week. “I’m on a real Canadian kick,” said a complete stranger at a dinner party when she learned I had lived in Canada for nigh on thirty years. “They really are so impressive a people.” Friends of mine reported similar sentiments at their evenings out.
1945: CANADA COMES OF AGE 6465
SPECIAL REPORT

1945: CANADA COMES OF AGE

"Coming of age" means not that we had grown up but that we finally knew what we wanted to do with our lives. Whether we were right or wrong in our choices, Canada came of age in 1945. It was the year the Second World War ended. In April, some Canadians went to San Francisco and came to be known as the “helpful fixers” who assisted in founding the United Nations.
A Prairie Pulitzer 7677
BOOKS

A Prairie Pulitzer

Anne Giardini of Kamloops, B.C., almost drove into the back of a wood-chip truck when she heard the news on her car radio last week. An announcer had just revealed that her mother, Winnipeg-based novelist Carol Shields, had won the prestigious Pulitzer Prize for her novel The Stone Diaries.
WHY OKLAHOMA CITY? 2021
CANADA

WHY OKLAHOMA CITY?

It was just after 3 a.m. last Thursday morning, more than 18 hours after the deadliest terrorist bomb in American history detonated in front of a federal building in downtown Oklahoma City. And Justin Wagner, a 21year-old agricultural economy student at Oklahoma State University, was finally heading home.
Corporate Canada’s O.J. Simpson circus? 40d41
THE NATION’S BUSINESS

Corporate Canada’s O.J. Simpson circus?

When major Canadian companies with large numbers of shareholders disappear, their corporate autopsies usually raise more questions than they answer. Never has this been more true than for Royal Trustco Ltd., a blue-chip financial institution that underwent a traumatic reorganization in the spring of 1993.
'ALL WORK AND NO GLORY' 1011
CANADA

'ALL WORK AND NO GLORY'

Jean Charest’s itinerary sounds like the departure announcements at a bus depot: Oshawa, Lindsay, Peterborough, Napanee, Kingston. That was last week, but in the weeks and months since Charest took on the task of leading the Progressive Conservative Party, most weeks have been like that—days that start with meetings at breakfast and run through meetings at lunch and meetings at night and end finally about midnight.
Canada NOTES 1617

Canada NOTES

ARTWORKS DECLARED LEGAL Ontario Court Judge David McCombs ruled that paintings and sketches by Toronto artist Eli Langer that depict sexual activity between adults and children have artistic merit and are not child pornography. McCombs ordered that Langer’s works, which were seized by police in December, 1993, be returned to him.
DOLLAR DAZED 3637
BUSINESS

DOLLAR DAZED

The Sony Store in east-end Winnipeg is a consumer mecca, where highend televisions, stereos and video recorders beckon shoppers. But lately people determined to buy products made by the famous Japanese firm have been gasping at more than just the electronic wizardry—sticker shock has also taken their breath away.
In search of leadership 8081
COLUMN

In search of leadership

Spring is supposed to be the time of renewal. Hope springs eternal, etc. A young man’s fancy turns to you-knowwhat. Buds burst, birds sing and baseball reappears. That’s the problem. Why is the mood so sour, fans not picking up their season tickets, everyone surly, including the hotdog vendors? The answer is that no one can run anything anymore.
Business NOTES 4040a

Business NOTES

Rogers Communications Inc. surprised the industry last week when it announced that it will not be exercising its option to increase its stake in Unitel Communications Inc. Unitel, the telephone companies’ biggest competitor in the longdistance telephone market, is currently owned by Canadian Pacific Ltd., Rogers and U.S. telephone giant AT&T Corp. Rogers, which now owns 30 per cent of Unitel, has an option to buy CP’s 48-per-cent stake for $210 million.
QUESTIONING THE RECORD 7475
SPECIAL REPORT

QUESTIONING THE RECORD

THE EXPERTS WAGE A BATTLE FOR HISTORY
April 241995 May 81995