May 4, 1998

The Mail 67
LETTERS

The Mail

Children of divorce I’m a 16-year-old girl whose parents broke up when I was 5. Your articles make it easier to realize that I’m not the only one dealing with such a complicated issue (“After divorce,” Cover, April 20). Even though I was so young, I can still tell you every detail about the day my father left.
ANYWHERE COMMUNICATIONS 36_236_3
WIRELESS

ANYWHERE COMMUNICATIONS

The new era of mobile satellite telephony brings true meaning to global communications
Crimes of hate 2627
Canada

Crimes of hate

Murder charges revive the B.C. racism debate
THE SECOND GENESIS 4849
Essays on the MILLENNIUM

THE SECOND GENESIS

SCIENCE MAY BE READY TO CREATE A PERFECT WORLD-BUT WHO WILL DEFINE PERFECT?
Ottawa faces the big squeeze 2223
COVER

Ottawa faces the big squeeze

Even at a time when they need to prove they have a heart, bankers still have a way of looking like bankers. The industry’s public relations machine has been revved lately: soft-focus television ads, barnstorming CEOs, speed-dialling lobbyists—all aimed at winning Ottawa’s approval for a pair of bank megamergers.
Exhausting victory 6061
Health

Exhausting victory

Chronic fatigue syndrome wins legal recognition
Is Bigger Really Better? 1617
COVER

Is Bigger Really Better?

Powerful forces are reshaping the nation's financial landscape
PCS: A Canadian Success Story 36_1036_11
WIRELESS

PCS: A Canadian Success Story

With files from Trevor Marshall The deployment of personal communications services (PCS) has arguably been one of the greatest success stories in the Canadian wireless industry. Since the Minister of Industry, the Hon. John Manley, awarded four national PCS licences in December 1995, the winners - Microcell Telecommunications Inc., Clearnet Communications Inc., Rogers Cantel Inc. and the members of the Mobility Canada consortium -| have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in building and/or upgrading national networks.
When the past becomes the future 1213
COLUMNS

When the past becomes the future

In politics, as in clothing fashions, everything old becomes new again. Just as every teenager today in shoulder-length hair, skintight shirt and platform shoes looks airlifted straight from the pages of a 1973 high-school yearbook, so, in politics, do familiar names abound.
Universal mysteries 5455
Science

Universal mysteries

A unique Canadian project has Nobel Prize potential
The Blair phenomenon 3435
World

The Blair phenomenon

A year after his landslide, the prime minister is more popular than ever
Pablo wows Ottawa 64_264_3
Art

Pablo wows Ottawa

The National Gallery’s Picasso show is a huge hit
Paul Martin's brave banking front 4243
COLUMNS

Paul Martin's brave banking front

The Nation’s Business
April 271998 May 111998