January 25, 1999

Essays on the MILLENNIUM 2000

LOOKING FOR LEADERSHIP

COVER

Wild Weather

The Mail

The Mail

LOOKING FOR LEADERSHIP 5051
Essays on the MILLENNIUM 2000

LOOKING FOR LEADERSHIP

Among the more than 80 social trends that my colleagues and I monitor is one we call “apocalyptic anxiety”— the fear that the world is rushing towards some as-yet undefined disaster. This anxiety has grown over the past year, with a sense of impending doom extending from coast to coast.
Wild Weather 1617
COVER

Wild Weather

As a storm raged outside, the constantly ringing phones went unanswered at Environment Canada’s Toronto offices last Thursday. Like many other workplaces in the city, it was shut down—by the worst series of blizzards ever to strike Toronto.
The Mail 44a
The Mail

The Mail

Your articles on “Canada’s obesity epidemic” were both timely and informative (Cover, Jan. 11). I do feel, however, that among associated health risks, some mention should have been made of snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. Not all sufferers of those conditions are obese, but a significant majority would be helped by loss of weight.
‘HOMELESSNESS IS FIXABLE' 2425
COVER

‘HOMELESSNESS IS FIXABLE'

Timothy B. was taking the storm in stride. Home on this cold, miserable night, which had brought the country’s largest city to an icy halt, was a spot on the floor of the Moss Park Armoury in downtown Toronto, a few blankets for a bed. It was snowing so hard outside that his efforts to make a few bucks by sweeping sidewalks for merchants had failed.
Canada NOTES 3435
CANADA

Canada NOTES

Statistics Canada reported that the prevalence of asthma among children under 15 rose to 11.2 per cent in 1994-1995. In 1978-1979, the incidence rate was just 2.5 per cent. Although Stats-Can did not offer any particular cause for the quadrupling in the rate, past studies have pointed to poor indoor air quality due to energy-efficient, airtight homes that trap mould, chemical fumes, dust mites and cigarette smoke.
The ranting 'redneck' 6263
Media

The ranting 'redneck'

In his heyday as founder and editor-in-chief of the feisty, ultra-conservative Alberta Report newsmagazine, Ted Byfield was famous for his newsroom rants and rages. As deadlines approached, he would pace the floor, railing at editors to get their copy in on time.
A SHOCK DOWN THE LINE 4243
Business

A SHOCK DOWN THE LINE

Chris King expected to spend the afternoon talking wages and benefits when she sat down for a union-management bargaining session at a downtown Montreal hotel on Jan. 11. King, a Bell Canada operator from Windsor, Ont., was part of a 15-member team negotiating a new contract for 2,400 unionized operators employed by the Montrealbased telecommunications giant.
Raising the stakes over magazines 3031
CANADA

Raising the stakes over magazines

Ask a Canadian government official to justify the proposed federal law designed to protect Canadian magazine publishers, and the answer often rises to lofty rhetoric about “Canadian voices telling Canadian stories.” Ask Richard Fisher, the second-highest-ranking American trade negotiator, why he is leading the fight against the Canadian law, and he also claims the high ground: of “upholding a significant principle.”
January 181999 February 11999