April 8, 2002

Business

Can the Aspers do it?

Life

THE DAYCARE DILEMMA

The Week That Was

The Week That Was

Can the Aspers do it? 4849
Business

Can the Aspers do it?

Izzy Asper loves his newspapers. But they’ve brought big headaches.
THE DAYCARE DILEMMA 5859
Life

THE DAYCARE DILEMMA

As other countries move toward universal, quality child care, Canada continues to drag its feet
The Week That Was 12_b13
The Week That Was

The Week That Was

"Let me help you up," one survivor said to a wounded woman lying in the twisted rubble of the seaside hotel in Netanya, Israel. “How can you help me?” the woman told him. “I don’t have legs.” The crowd of 250 people had gathered for a Passover seder, the ritual meal that marks the start of the weeklong Jewish holiday.
The Mail 44_a
The Mail

The Mail

There’s no question the mechanical heart pump will be very beneficial to people with heart problems (“The pump of life,” Cover, March 25). However, the long-term strategy should address clogged arteries through preventive medicine that is both effective and non-invasive.
THE BEASTMASTER 4243
Canada and the World

THE BEASTMASTER

Peter May builds dinosaurs for a living, and museums just can’t get enough
Queen of Hearts 2223
Cover

Queen of Hearts

With her twinkly-eyed charm, she Was the most beloved royal, but the Queen Mother was also a steely defender of tradition
WAKE UP,CANADA 4647
Essay

WAKE UP,CANADA

A reminder that government is ‘us’ and not ‘them’
THAT ETHICS THING 3839
Canada

THAT ETHICS THING

Can the Liberals sidestep the tough questions?
Overture 8_d9
Overture

Overture

The winners were feeling expansive at the 2001 Canadian Sport Awards last week in Toronto. After the CBC-televised event concluded, the female-athlete-of-the-year, speed skater Catriona Le May Doan, talked about an athlete’s responsibility to do good works in the community.
Sex, evil and indifference 1212_a
Over to You

Sex, evil and indifference

Every night, women who work on the street face the fear that this shift may be their last. These women normally call themselves “working girls” or “working women,” and regard themselves as doing a job like anyone else—the difference is only in the product for sale.
April 12002 April 152002