June 17, 2002

THE FOURTH ANNUAL RANKING Measuring health care 2223
Health Report

THE FOURTH ANNUAL RANKING Measuring health care

Imagine for a moment that you’re a smoker who’s been meaning to quit a pack-a-day habit for a while now. Or, if you can’t picture yourself as a nicotine addict, maybe your doctor has been after you to trim that Molson muscle around your expanding midriff.
A MAN IN A HURRY 3233
Canada

A MAN IN A HURRY

Stories about Paul Martin always seem to contain an element of frenetic activity or plain haste. There’s the one about what amounted to his first date with Sheila Cowan, a friend of his younger sister. Martin, then a University of Toronto law student, took her on a breakneck drive to a cottage.
The Week That Was 1213
The Week That Was

The Week That Was

Scientists have long been fascinated with trying to determine when the first creatures crawled onto land from the primordial seas. Now a group studying an abandoned quarry near Kingston, Ont., has found footprints embedded in sandstone that is 480 million to 500 million years old.
READY FOR THE G8 8485
Canada and the World

READY FOR THE G8

Ah, but the good Chairman never had the pleasure of meeting the Revolutionary Knitting Circle. On the first Tuesday of every month, about a dozen avid Calgary knitters gather to compare stitches, swap patterns and nosh on assorted munchies.
The Mail 45
The Mail

The Mail

I am always pleased to see attention given to our cities, but much of the recent media coverage of Canadas urban woes seems awfully misdirected (“Saving our cities,” Cover, June 3). I would hardly characterize the resurgence of urban living in Canadian cities during the 1980s and ’90s as decline.
CROSSING THE RUBICON 7677
Canada

CROSSING THE RUBICON

It was appropriate that as he embarked on the biggest political gamble of his life, Paul Martin chose to talk about wavering at the edge of the Rubicon. Ordered by Prime Minister Jean Chrétien to stand down in his campaign to replace him, the finance minister saw the parallels with a momentous turning point in the history of the ancient world.
Iraq, loved and lost 1213
Over to You

Iraq, loved and lost

On many bright mornings, Bethani and Luli darted barefoot across the street from their house to mine, carrying an enamel bowl of goats milk yogourt and a heap of unleavened bread, fresh from their mother's oven. We often shared breakfast on my veranda, using the international language of small children—an elaborate code of shrugs and shy smiles.
The Bloody on the Muddy 2021
COLUMNS

The Bloody on the Muddy

The mighty Mississippi rises just south of Winnipeg. It divides America. Mario Cuomo, the Hamlet-on-theHudson, the most articulate politician of his time as governor of New York State, finally decided he would not seek the presidency in 1992 because, pundits observed, west of the Mississippi he had too many vowels in his name.
Après lui, le déluge 8283
COLUMNS

Après lui, le déluge

In retrospect, its hard to remember just how bad the situation really was in the summer of 1994. Even Paul Martin did not quite grasp the extent of the crisis. He knew the 1994-1995 deficit was going to be high. But if pushed hard, the finance minister would argue that Canada could eventually grow its way out of that $37.5 billion shortfall through higher revenues.
June 102002 June 242002