April 6, 2009

THE RISE OF ‘TALQAEDA’ 2627
NATIONAL

THE RISE OF ‘TALQAEDA’

He’s not your typical-looking militant, nothing like the tall, ascetic Osama bin Laden or the choleric Ayman al-Zawahiri. He says nothing to a visiting reporter about destroying the evil West or raining vengeance down on the infidels.
MAIL BAG 67

MAIL BAG

IT WOULD SEEM alarming to many that the crime in Saskatoon has risen so far above the national average, as you reported in “The most dangerous cities in Canada” (National, March 16). Your report points out the real problems we are experiencing with core neighbourhood poverty, gangs, crime and at-risk youth.
INTERVIEW 1617

INTERVIEW

Q:Your headphones are to help you hear? A. Yes. I'm sorry about the headphones. I'm as deaf as a jug. Q. Not to worry. Why did you become a monk? A. My three older brothers were monks as well. I was hit early by my calling, you might say. I was nine when I first went to the monastery.
SHARING ALBERTAS PAIN 2223
NATIONAL

SHARING ALBERTAS PAIN

Nick Cook, an athletic farm boy from B.C. with Ross Rebagliati good looks, was just out of high school when he arrived in the energy hub of Nisku, Alta., two years ago, looking for work. Within days he’d scored a job as a leasehand, the lowest rung on the drill-rig ladder.
A love story told by small objects 5253
THE BACK PAGES

A love story told by small objects

Last month, Leanne Shapton—a 35-year-old Canadian artist and illustrator, and the art director of the New York Times’ op-ed page—published her charming and inventive new book, a fictional love story disguised as an auction catalogue, called Important Artifacts and Personal Property From the Collection of Lenore Doolan and Harold Morris, Including Books, Street Fashion, and Jewelry (Sarah Crichton Books/Farrar Straus & Giroux).
RETIRING INTO THE UNKNOWN 3435
BUSINESS

RETIRING INTO THE UNKNOWN

Most of the carnage wrought by the economic crisis that’s ripped through the country over the past year is obvious: the lost jobs, the bankrupt companies, the shuttered manufacturing plants. But a bigger and far less visible effect of the financial meltdown has been the way it decimated the retirement plans of millions of Canadians in just a few cruel months.
HELPING FRIENDS IN NEED 2021
NATIONAL

HELPING FRIENDS IN NEED

It’s a rather inauspicious date, but construction work on the Canadian Museum of Human Rights in Winnipeg is scheduled to begin April 1. There won’t be a lot of fanfare— an official groundbreaking ceremony was held just before Christmas. Heritage Minister James Moore made the trek to the frozen site at the forks of the Red and Assiniboine rivers.
Knock-knock. It’s the gag police. 5657
THE BACK PAGES

Knock-knock. It’s the gag police.

Did you hear the one about the queer, the Muzzie and the pre-op tranny? No? Well, you’re unlikely to any time soon. The British government, fresh from recent proscriptions on religious and racial “hatred,” is pushing ahead with legislation that will criminalize homophobic jokes.
ECONOWATCH 3839
BUSINESS

ECONOWATCH

Did Suncor and Petro-Canada just make a huge mis take? After all, when they announced their all-stock $19-billion deal to merge earlier this week, it looked like they were just taking one struggling oil company and hitching it to another one.
NEWSMAKERS 1213
7 DAYS THE WEEK OF 03/23

NEWSMAKERS

Greg Gutfeld, host of Fox News’ unpopular comedy chat show Red Eye, joked that Canadian soldiers need time off from Kandahar to do yoga and stroll on the beach, adding: “I didn’t even know they were in the war.” Broadcast just before four more Canadian troops were killed in Afghanistan, his remarks triggered outrage from Ottawa.
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