February 8, 2010

FLEEING THE CAPITAL 2223
WORLD

FLEEING THE CAPITAL

The broken blocks of concrete that fell from his house during the earthquake killed Vladimir Desir’s wife and child, and split open the top of his head. Bleeding badly, he tried to find medical help in Port-au-Prince. There wasn’t any. Desir gambled that he’d have a better chance of receiving care in Jacmel, a city 60 km to the southwest.
Be careful what you text in China 2627
WORLD

Be careful what you text in China

Another virtual brick has been added to what has been dubbed “The Great Firewall of China.” According to the state-run China Daily, police will provide mobile phone companies with a set of “key words” deemed “unhealthy.” Text messages will then be searched by the cell companies for those phrases.
Recovery is here: bring on the lattes 3637
Business

Recovery is here: bring on the lattes

When looking for clues about a recovery, economists generally pore over data on factory orders, housing starts, and even something called the Baltic Dry Index, which measures shipping volumes of coal and iron ore, among other things.
FOR THE RECORD 1617

FOR THE RECORD

“She told me this morning that the snow is cold. And mom is putting a new winter coat on them and cleaning them up. It looks like to me they got a lot of sleep. I am just grateful they are here and safe.”—New Brunswick resident Gerry Naugler speaking about his adoptive daughter and other Haitian children, who were among the first to arrive in Canada for a fast-tracked adoption after the earthquake that devastated their country
MAIL BAG 67

MAIL BAG

CATHY GULLI’S excellent article “The scary truth about airport security” (National, Jan. 25) illustrates that we are evolving into a police state where everyone is expected to spy on everyone else. Only that can never work: even the ghastly nightmare George Orwell depicted in 1984 would require literally a one-to-one surveillance: half of society would spend 24 hours a day spying on the other half.
INTERVIEW 1415

INTERVIEW

Q: Has having a bunch of Europeans on the Raptors’ roster helped you learn a new language or two? A: I’m picking up Spanish. Q: Swearing in another language doesn’t count. A: No, I’m a student. I have tutoring today. I’ve been taking it since October. Twice a week, depending on the schedule.
Going for gold and profit, too 3637
Business

Going for gold and profit, too

Warm weather and a lack of snowfall on Vancouver’s North Shore mountains, where some Olympic events will be staged, have forced organizers to dig out their contingency plans, which include scraping, shovelling and heli-lifting snow in from higher elevations.
The war on the civil service 1617
NATIONAL

The war on the civil service

Ever since Stephen Harper anointed Stockwell Day as his cost-cutter-in-chief last week, the Prime Minister’s Office has been going out of its way to highlight the significance of shifting Day to head the Treasury Board in an otherwise hohum cabinet shuffle.
Helen Upperton SPEED DEMON 4445
Canada's Olympians

Helen Upperton SPEED DEMON

Bobsled pilot Helen Upperton has elevated the pre-competition ritual to the standard of high voodoo. Her brakeman, Shelley-Ann Brown, twists her hair into elaborate “speed braids” that Upperton swears make her faster. She paints her fingernails black.
NEWSMAKERS 89
THIS WEEK

NEWSMAKERS

Russian champion ice dancers Oksana Domnina and Maxim Shabalin wowed European judges with their program based on Australian Aboriginal music and dress, but they face an uncertain welcome at Olympic competition in Vancouver. Their costumes, dark-toned bodysuits decorated with paint, eucalyptus leaves and red loincloths, have enraged Australian Aboriginal leaders.
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