July 14, 2014

As she lay dying 4849
Society

As she lay dying

ON MARCH 23, 2014, I was in Nashville, Tenn., writing songs with my friend, multiple Grammy Award winner Keith Stegall. We were writing in hopes of placing some of our songs on the new Alan Jackson album. Keith discovered Alan, who is now a country music superstar, his worldwide record sales surpassing 70 million albums.
Why it happened again 1617
National

Why it happened again

When emergency crews rushed through the front door that winter night—Jan. 21, 2014—they found white tiles covered in blood and two people clinging to life. It was a gruesome, chaotic scene, even for a seasoned paramedic. Whoever swung the blade, again and again, had already fled.
THE END OF GOLF 3637
Economy

THE END OF GOLF

There were already 11 other golf courses nearby when Don MacKay set about to build Muskoka Highlands in 1992. At the time, it wasn’t clear whether Ontario’s cottage country, two hours north of Toronto, could support a 12th course, but MacKay believed in his business plan—a lowkey, public links-style facility—and convinced a cautious banker to loan him the money.
America surrenders 2627
International

America surrenders

ON A SATURDAY afternoon in July 2012, then-secretary of state Hillary Clinton invited CIA director David Petraeus to her brick colonial home in Washington. The four-star general had led George W. Bush’s U.S. troop surge in Iraq and President Barack Obama’s in Afghanistan.
A nation dissolves 2829
International

A nation dissolves

ON THIS LONELY stretch of parched earth in a tiny farming village, where the only sounds are the bleating of thirsty sheep and the howling of a scorching wind, the sense that something is wrong is undeniable. Dugarkan has been abandoned by fearful locals and is now occupied by a group of armed men who stare off menacingly into the dusty horizon, looking for trouble.
THE SKELETON CREW: HOW AMATEUR SLEUTHS ARE SOLVING AMERICA’S COLDEST CASES 6061
MACLEAN'S BACK PAGES

THE SKELETON CREW: HOW AMATEUR SLEUTHS ARE SOLVING AMERICA’S COLDEST CASES

Modern-day versions of Sherlock Holmes abound on the Internet. Web sleuths, as they’re called, are amateur detectives who pore over missing-persons reports to try to crack cases on which the police have long given up. Deborah Halber travelled across the United States interviewing these unsung, unpaid DIY investigators.
LETTERS 67
This Week

LETTERS

I applaud you for the article regarding the three RCMP officers who lost their lives in Moncton (“Running toward danger,” National, June 23). While gone, they leave a legacy of trust and commitment that is so obviously the attitude of most RCMP officers.
THE INTERVIEW 1415
This Week

THE INTERVIEW

In April, Victoria Coren Mitchell became the first two-time winner on the European Poker Tour. Today, she is one of the winningest women in poker, ranking ninth internationally with total earnings of $2.6 million. Yet Coren Mitchell, 41, is more than the sum of her cards.
A mecca for whodunits that’s really dunit 5859
MACLEAN'S BACK PAGES

A mecca for whodunits that’s really dunit

"Before we start, does everyone have a Jammy Dodger?” asks David Torrans, the owner of No Alibis bookshop in leafy South Belfast, Northern Ireland, where Jammy Dodgers are a popular brand of tea biscuits. Torrans was hosting another standing-room-only event last month, this time to kick off the Belfast Book Festival.
God is everywhere but in the details 5455
MACLEAN'S BACK PAGES

God is everywhere but in the details

Religion is big on television today, with producers racing to serve the Christian market with reality shows such as American Bible Challenge and Preachers’ Daughters, and miniseries like The Bible. But the most in-depth studies of religious issues may be occurring on secular dramas that never say the word God, such as Fargo or Hannibal.
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