August 25, 2014

DISUNITED KINGDOM 2829
International

DISUNITED KINGDOM

ON A RECENT Monday evening, a handful of people met at their usual rendezvous point: an immense parking lot outside of a grocery store in Bathgate, Scotland, an old industrial town of 15,000 that lies on the M8 motorway between Glasgow and Edinburgh.
THE INTERVIEW 1415
This Week

THE INTERVIEW

Justin Trudeau’s hair is shorter than it was even at the beginning of the year, his suit less flashy. He was wearing a necktie in muted colours for a Tuesday-morning interview, but took it off as soon as he saw his interrogator wasn’t wearing one.
THE TROUBLE WITH BRUNCH: WORK, CLASS AND THE PURSUIT OF LEISURE Shawn Micallef 6667
MACLEAN'S BACK PAGES

THE TROUBLE WITH BRUNCH: WORK, CLASS AND THE PURSUIT OF LEISURE Shawn Micallef

Brunch has long been ripe for ridicule. Anthony Bourdain took a cleaver to it, metaphorically speaking, in Kitchen Confidential, a book destined to dissuade anyone from ordering eggs Benedict ever again. The midday event was also routinely mocked on the TV show Portlandia, that skewer of artisanal and hipster pretension.
LETTERS 67
This Week

LETTERS

No external pressure is going to stop Vladimir Putin’s headstrong madness (“Just try to stop him,” International, Aug. 11). Only internal pressure from the Russian people will have any effect. Western leaders need to close airports in the free world to all Aeroflot flights.
Reclaiming Mount Polley 2425
National

Reclaiming Mount Polley

Uprooted trees, muddied water with a silvery sheen, fish belly-up on the surface. There was something essentially unCanadian about the first galling photos to emerge out of Mount Polley, B.C., where a copper and gold mine’s tailings pond—a containment area where the waste produced through the mining process is treated and allowed to dry before being disposed—burst through its earthen walls last week.
The one story that could save your life 6465
MACLEAN'S BACK PAGES

The one story that could save your life

Whether you’re a reader of Time, CNN and ESPN, or thousands of other, smaller online publications, you’ve encountered a widget under a story pointing to other “content you may like.” With their sensationalist headlines—“15 celebs with physical deformities,” “9 people you won’t actually believe exist,” “Biggest, fastest weight loss”— and cheap thumbnail art, the links are crass, shameless and usually ugly.
CLEANING UP THE SPLATTER 1819
National

CLEANING UP THE SPLATTER

The fireworks that accompanied last week’s special report by Alberta Auditor-General Merwan Saher were, at first blush, a little mysterious. The A-G’s report into disgraced premier Alison Redford’s bizarre use of government aircraft had already been partially leaked, and did not contain much that had not already been reported.
Chasing fear and panic 4243
International

Chasing fear and panic

Eight months after the first signs of trouble in West Africa, there have been, at last count, 1,848 infections and 1,013 deaths from the Ebola virus. Panic and fear, but not the disease, have spread through much of the world. The World Health Organization says Ebola is raging out of control in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone faster than efforts to stop it.
Keeping secrets 4041
International

Keeping secrets

What happens when a group of U.S. senators launches a five-year investigation into torture by the CIA? The Senate staffers’ computers get hacked, their emails get read and documents disappear from their hard drives. Then the CIA attempts to launch a criminal case against the staffers.
WAR ON TWO FRONTS 3637
International

WAR ON TWO FRONTS

Back in June, the tea shops and barbershops of Erbil, the prosperous capital of Iraq’s Kurdistan region, were buzzing with talk of a deal made with the devil. Not far away, 80 km to the northwest in Mosul, a brutal gang of religious fanatics had suddenly and thoroughly routed the Iraqi army.
August 182014 September 82014