September 22, 2014

The Coderre treatment 1819
The Coderre treatment

The Coderre treatment

BY MARTIN PATRiQuiN ■ It’s the smile you notice first. Broad, toothy and visible from across the room, it stretches his face seemingly to his eyeballs—a caricaturist’s dream in the flesh. Next, the handshake: firm, professional, brief. You can then expect a slap on the back, an eerily accurate personal anecdote about your family, and perhaps a remark about the Montreal Canadiens.
THE INTERVIEW 1415
THE EDITORIAL

THE INTERVIEW

left’s most visible and controversial figure. The Canadian author and journalist shot to global prominence in 2000 with No Logo, the movement Bible for anti-globalization activists. In This Changes Everything: Capitalism and the Climate, hitting shelves Sept.
Finding Franklin 4041
Society

Finding Franklin

THE MOMENT WHEN Ryan Harris first laid eyes on one of Sir John Franklin’s missing ships was one of panic as much as jubilation. He was taking a break in the cuddy of the small research vessel Investigator when he heard a commotion outside. Fellow Parks Canada underwater archaeologist Jonathan Moore was worried that the side-scan sonar trailing behind the boat had drifted dangerously close to the sea floor.
The end of Ukraine? 2627
The end of Ukraine?

The end of Ukraine?

BY MICHAEL PETROU ■ “We condemn in the strongest terms Russia’s escalating and illegal intervention in Ukraine and demand that Russia stop and withdraw its forces from inside Ukraine and along the Ukrainian border.” So declared the member states of most powerful military alliance in history, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, at the conclusion of its annual summit in Wales last week.
A WIFE’S QUEST FOR ANSWERS 4647
Society

A WIFE’S QUEST FOR ANSWERS

NINE YEARS HAD passed since Franklin set sail in 1845, and the Hudson’s Bay Company had led two searches, both of which confirmed no one survived the expedition. England’s attention turned to the Crimean War, but Franklin’s widow could not rest.
THE COLUMNISTS 1213
THE EDITORIAL

THE COLUMNISTS

THE FINAL TALLY in the first ballot of the Alberta Conservative leadership anybody knows, since the figures were announced aloud once and there still hasn’t been a press release—was Jim Prentice, 17,963; Ric Mclver, 2,742; Thomas Lukaszuk, 2,681. All of these numbers are jaw-dropping.
On the road to terror 2829
The end of Ukraine?

On the road to terror

BY ADNAN R. KHAN ■ There was something out of place in the small brick house on a quiet lane in Azaz, Syria. It wasn’t the décor, which was typical for a middle-class home in this part of northern Syria, nor was it the group of six men gathered around a table in the foyer.
Redemption man 4849
MACLEAN’S BACK PAGES

Redemption man

BY BARRY HERTZ • Jean-Marc Vallée’s Wild is the perfect fall-season film. Adapted from Cheryl Strayed’s bestselling memoir about hiking the Pacific Coast Trail, the movie, one of the most discussed this week at the Toronto International Film Festival, is full of richly drawn characters, lofty meditations on life and death, and the inevitable triumph over adversity.
A light goes on for GE 3637
The end of Ukraine?

A light goes on for GE

BY CHRIS SORENSEN ■ In the popular TV sitcom 30 Rock, Alec Baldwin played Jack Donaghy, an ambitious NBC executive, whose rise up the ranks of parent company General Electric landed him the hilariously awkward corporate title of vice-president of East Coast television and microwave oven programming.
LETTERS 67
THE EDITORIAL

LETTERS

There is no doubt something must be done about the problem of missing Aboriginal women (The Editorial, Sept. 8). However, I must agree with the government’s rationale not to hold another inquiry. Numerous inquiries have been done in the past.
September 152014 September 292014