September 28, 2015

National

Vanishing Canada

ELECTION 2015

One economy, three visions

International

TRUMP VS. THE POPE

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National

Vanishing Canada

When told that his small Prairie town had, in profound ways, fallen off the statistical map of Canada, Walter Streelasky, mayor of Melville, Sask., is incredulous. Streelasky had no idea Melville had been rendered a “statistical ghost town” after the mandatory long-form census was cut in 2010, and fewer than 50 per cent of Melville’s 4,500 residents completed the voluntary National Household Survey that replaced it in the 2011 census.

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ELECTION 2015

One economy, three visions

THE REAL CAMPAIGN on the economy has been a long time coming. Through most of August, the Mike Duffy trial, with its revelations about how Stephen Harper’s aides handled the Senate spending scandal, often drowned out what the party leaders were saying out on the hustings.

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International

TRUMP VS. THE POPE

A papal visit is always an event writ large, an Olympics-sized security headache-cum-commercial extravaganza. During the Philadelphia leg of Pope Francis’s Sept. 19 to 28 visit to Cuba and the U.S., the city will grind to a halt, with the schools closed for three days, the NFL’s Eagles on the road-after being personally lobbied to get out of town by Philadelphia Archbishop Charles Chaput—and Homeland Security designating the visit as a National Special Security Event.

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This Week

THE INTERVIEW

A professor at the University of Pennsylvania, David Grazian spent years studying the intricacies of American nightlife. When his son was born, he traded shot glasses for poop shovels, working behind the scenes as a volunteer zookeeper.

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ELECTION 2015

Shhh, quiet, please

Last week’s “all candidates debate on women’s rights and gender equity” in Halifax was falsely billed: Not all candidates were present. NDP candidate (and incumbent) Megan Leslie, Andy Fillmore of the Liberals and Thomas Trappenberg of the Green party agreed to participate.

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MACLEAN'S BACK PAGES

ARMS: THE CULTURE AND CREDO OF THE GUN

In the late 1860s, Americans had a different kind of gun problem: They weren’t very good shots. Their best marksmen routinely lost in shooting competitions to Englishmen, Germans and Canadians. And to Gen. George Wingate and Col. William C. Church, Union Army officers during the Civil War, this was worse than an embarrassment.

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Universities

DIVERSITY AMONG DOCTORS

For Jessica Dunkley, getting into medical school was no ordinary childhood dream. Deaf since the day she was born, Dunkley aspired to become a doctor when, at age 10, her aunt gave her a plastic human anatomy model with removable organs. She didn’t think it was possible until, in her mid-20s, she happened to read about deaf doctors practising in the United States.

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Universities

Forget ‘plug-and-chug’

Before Adam Schachner enrolled at McGill University, he thought of himself as an inventor. He figured a degree in mechanical engineering would teach him the skills to build almost anything, but it didn’t work out the way he hoped. “I wanted to work on projects and we almost never got to,” he says.

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MACLEAN'S BACK PAGES

The short, wondrous life of Oscar Cahén

TASTE: Will donairs take over the U.S.? p.59 ■ BOOKS: How Canada taught America to love guns; a The production of a magazine on deadline, rather like the creation of a fine sausage, is a process best left behind closed doors. Better to savour the finished product than to witness the work in progress.

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This Week

LETTERS

In “Playing both sides against the middle” (Sept. 7), Paul Wells has it exactly right: The answer in Canada is to continue developing our oil and gas in the near future, while swiftly investing in and planning our transition to renewable energy—for goodness’ sake, some time before the year 2100, please.
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