WOMEN and THEIR WORK

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

EDWINA SETON May 1 1923
WOMEN and THEIR WORK

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

EDWINA SETON May 1 1923

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

CONDUCTED BY EDWINA SETON

Question—Mrs. J. P. H., Ontario—I

find it necessary to try and earn some money at home if possible, and would like your advice with regard to taking a course in one of the Show Card Writing Schools.

Answer—I do not recommend that correspondents should take such a course, as it has been overdone, and Show Card writers in the cities are unable to get work.

! Perhaps there is something you already j know how to do that would be saleable, i Can you make black Dinah rag dolls, with j shoe-button eyes and calico clothes, out of ! old stockings? There is always a demand

for these. Can you turn out attractive bead necklaces? There is quite a craze for beads now in big centres when the women wear such dark afternoon dresses. Can you do filet crochet? Small linen handkerchiefs with a narrow filet edge sell well in cities. Is there nothing you could make that would sell on the transcontinental trains that pass through your town so often? Balsam pine cushions are well worth making if you have plenty of the sweet-scented, scrubby little balsams up there. You could get small boys to gather ,the needles, then make them up in

cushions of grey crash with a little touch of green embroidery—perhaps a spray of pine needles. I believe tourists would be* glad to pay $3 apiece for these fragrantpillows which last for years. Flowers, made of wool in pretty color combinations, are used for sports hats and are sometimes worn on the coat lapel or fur scaff to give a bright note. Perhaps one of these suggestions may help you.

Question—Miss P. C.—I would like to take either a course in household science or in convalescent nursing. Could you suggest some school in Canada where a one-year course in household science is given similar to the one given at the Y. W. C. A. School of Household Science, Boston? I would prefer to take a course in Canada, but every school or college that I know of gives either a two or fouryear course, and I feel I can only spare one year to train. Also could you tell me of some hospital or nursing home either in Toronto or Montreal where I could take a short course in convalescent nursing?

Answer—Macdonald Institute, Guelph, gives a Homemaker Course, planned for those who can only spend one college year there. A diploma is awarded to those who successfully pass their examinations in this course. The calendar does not give very specific information, so I would advise you to write direct, explaining your position, and ask them if by means of taking this course you will be equipped to earn your living as a dietitian or institutional housekeeper.

As for convalescent nursing, I have never heard of it, nor is it known to the Graduate Nurses Association here. Perhaps it is something that has been started in the States. Sometimes girls take one year’s training as a nurse, and then are capable of handling convalescent cases; these nurses are termed undergraduates. I do not know if any hospital would be willing to take a girl and train her for one year, but if you could find one that would, doubtless an opportunity would be made to give you all the experience possible in that period. Possibly some sanatorium might have such an opening, and there, dealing with convalescents, the training -would be particularly useful in view of the use to which you were going to put it. Your family doctor will be able to tell you of some good institutions of this kind.

Question—Mrs. V. S. A., Ontario— Having read with interest some of your replies to the questions, I too have ventured to come for help. Have lived all my life on a farm until we lost everything by fire and were forced to come to town to live, and I certainly miss the pin money I used to make with butter and eggs. As I saw you mentioned frogs’ legs and shipping them to the city, could you give me any addresses where they would buy them when the season comes. My brother used to catch them and prepare the hind legs like chicken, and they were really delicious. Is there anything else you can suggest? I can make children’s clothes quite neatly.

Answer—Regarding supplying frogs’ legs, you might write to the Queen’s Hotel, Toronto, also the King Edward Hotel there, and ask if they will give you orders. If you sew neatly, could you not make children’s rompers or smocks for little girls, getting a good pattern? If the place you live in is too small to market them, you could try the nearest large town.

Question—Mrs. B. L., Ontario—I am good at crocheting, and would like to make money at home that way. Could you give me some information how to go about it?

Answer—The only way is to work up a local trade. This is not easy in a small place, I know, but it seems almost impossible to find a market for crochet work, in cities in which you do not live.

Question—Mrs. A. H., Toronto—It is my intention to live the simple life as a woman-farmer, and I am writing to you to see if you could tell me if you know of any suitable place I could locate. I want a house in good repair with about ten acres of land, a bit of bush and a stream. It must be both pretty and reasonable. Could you advise me where to find such a place, suitable for market gardening?

Answer—Perhaps some of our Ontario readers may know of a property of this description. If so, I should be grateful for particulars to forward to Mrs. A. H. who is to be admired for her enterprising spirit.