WOMEN and THEIR WORK

MacLean’s Question Box

EDWINA SETON June 15 1923
WOMEN and THEIR WORK

MacLean’s Question Box

EDWINA SETON June 15 1923

MacLean’s Question Box

EDWINA SETON

Question—Miss M. F., Ontario: I

am enclosing samples of my first attempt at newspaper writing. Will you give me your opinion and advise where I might market same. I could supply a weekly, a bi-weekly, or write a series of letters. The material is authentic—sent to me by a friend in the South.

Answer—You write in a bright, vivacious way, but the type of article that describes—in the form of a chatty letter—the latest fashions at Palm Beach, is rather overdone. The supply is greater than the demand. Almost any educated woman can write such articles. Try your hand at something of which you have first-hand experience. In your town there must be many interesting subjects that would make interesting articles.

Question—M. P., Manitoba: I would

like to get into some position where I could get experience in management, so that after a time I would be qualified to fill a place as matron or housekeeper in an institution, such as the Y.W.C.A., Children’s Home, or Old Folks Home. Kindly let me know if it is possible to get work of this kind. I am used to housework and experienced in dressmaking.

Answer—Most of these positions are advertised in the daily papers. You might get a list of the public institutions in Winnipeg and write a letter of application to a few of them, stating your qualifications. Or through your church ! connection you might find such an opening. But if you could spare the time to ¡ take the two-year institutional management course at MacDonald College, ' Guelph, you would be practically certain | of securing a well-paid position after you ¡ graduated.

Question—Mrs. H. A., N. Brunswick: Having tolerably pretty hair, which is coming out in handfuls, I am writing to enquire if there is any sale for such, or if you could put me in touch with anyone who might be interested.

Answer—Not a chance in the world. The best thing for you to do would be to apply a good tonic and stop shedding your crown of glory. I can give you a valuable old English recipe if you wish, but send stamped, addressed envelope.

Question—Mrs C., Alberta: My husband is out of work. Can you tell me if it would pay me to get an Auto-Knitter and make socks in my spare time. Thank you for your opinion.

Answer—Whether it would be wise to buy an Auto-Knitter depends on how expert you may become in using it. One of my correspondents wrote that she found the company paid too little for socks, about (1214 cents a pair) for it to be remunerative to work for them. She has been able to dispose of socks and stockings by private sale, however, and receives better prices that way. I believe the company to be thoroughly reliable, so it seems to be more a matter of the worker’s special fitness for the task, and the ability to work rapidly.