Women and their Work

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

EDWINA SETON June 15 1924
Women and their Work

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

EDWINA SETON June 15 1924

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

EDWINA SETON

Note: If a personal reply is desired., correspondents should enclose a stamped, selfaddressed envelope; otherwise the enquiry will have to await its turn in the Question Box.

Question—Mrs. E.A.L., Ont.: I have an old Paisley shawl, two by three yards, the usual Paisley colors. Can you give me an idea of its value?

Answer—There is no fixed value to such an article. I saw an old shawl of this kind sold at an auction sale for $25, but then again it might be hard to realize $10 on one.

Question—J.H.S.: Can you tell me where I could get in touch with a linotype school?

Answer—Toronto Central Technical School, Lippincott St., and Canadian Linotype Limited, 119 Adelaide Street, West, Toronto.

Question—Mrs. A.L.S., Sask.: Will you please recommend a book containing selections for recitations for an amateur? Could you tell me where to apply to get information for a paper on “Made in Canada” goods.

Answer—“The Golden Humorous Reciter,” “The Golden Reciter” (prose and verse), “Jessie Alexander’s Platform Sketches,” and “Encore,” by Jessie Alexander. The Canadian Manufacturers’ Association, Bank of Hamilton, Toronto, could give you information on “made in Canada” goods. Their magazine “Industrial Canada” would probably have much to interest you.

Question—Mrs. B.F.T., Man.: Can you give me a recipe for a cheap crack filler, to use in old floors—not putty?

Answer—Try the following mixture:— Buy a little paint in powder form, about five cents worth of burnt sienna and raw umber, some boiled linseed oil, some powdered whiting and fine hardwood sawdust. These are the ingredients that mixed together with glue compose the crack-filler. The glue can be in dry form. First mix the whiting with the linseed oil and sawdust, then add the hot glue, which has been melted with as little water as possible, and last put in the paint, stir well and apply while warm. It can be put in with a palette knife and soon hardens.

Question—Rose-Marie: My doctor

has ordered me to give up school-teaching and lead an outdoor life. Could you suggest any occupation for the summer that would pay something and be of an outdoor nature?

Answer—As you are so near B.C. I think fruit picking would suit you. The Co-operative Growers’ Association have branches at Penticton, Vernon and Kelowna. Write the secretary and enquiry about openings. I have also sent you the names and address of a couple of ranch owners in the Okanagan, with whom you can get in touch. The picking starts about the end of June.