Women and their Work

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

EDWINA SETON November 15 1925
Women and their Work

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

EDWINA SETON November 15 1925

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

EDWINA SETON

NOTE: When a personal reply is asked for, a stamped, self addressed envelope must be enclosed. No notice will be taken of anonymous communications. Writers must sign their names, net for publication, but as a guarantee of good faith.

Information about educational institutions and business places is confined to Canadian ones.

Question—Mrs. D.: Kindly advise if there is a possible way of breaking my Boston Bull terrier of the habit of dashing to the door and snapping at callers. Should I muzzle him? Can he eat and drink when muzzled?

Answer—W. A. Fraser, author and animal lover,states that the Boston Bull, being inbred to make him small, has sometimes no brains. He suggests you try to break him of his habit by keeping a strap handy; when he snaps, talk to him, saying, “You silly dog, aren’t you ashamed of yourself!” at the same time giving him a mild touch or two of the strap. If this does not cure him, he will either have to be muzzled or destroyed. He won’t be able to eat with a muzzle, but he can drink.

Question—R.G., Que.: I am quite adept in making cross word puzzles. Can you give me some addresses of companies who are after crossword puzzles?

Answer—As the McClure Newspaper Syndicate has daily Cross Word Puzzles in many newspapers, you might try there. Address is, 45 West 34th Street, New York City.

Question—L.S.: Can one take a short course in advertising—correspondence or otherwise—which would fit one for a position with a department store or advertising agency? Is there a demand for writers of advertisements, and is there decent monetary recompense for those who make good at the game? Can you tell me if small town merchants write their own newspaper ads. Which is the most highly paid branch of the work? I shall be grateful for information.

Answer—Any good advertising course is helpful; it is a subject that can be learned by correspondence. Yet some of i the most successful women copy-writers j are entirely self-taught. Salaries are good ! when writers are capable of producing ! bright, original copy, or at least copy that

reveals some charm or humor. From $25 to $50 a week can be earned by good advertising writers, and there is one woman employed by a department store who makes a very large income, some thousands a year, report says. At certain seasons of the year merchants in small places are often open to having special advertising done for them, giving a beginner a good chance to practise.

Question—Montreal Girl: We are going to build a small bungalow and would like to know of some books that would.be helpful. Can you tell me of any?

Answer—“The Small House for a Moderate Income,” by Ekin Wallick (published by Hearst’s International Library, N.Y.) and “Artistic Homes" by Mabel Tuke Priestman (Methuen & Co.. 36 Essex St., W.C., London). Fora very practical book with working specifications there is “How to Build a Home.”

Question—H.L.M.: Is it considered a sin if you have a chance to do good and don’t do it? For instance: If a grown person swears and you don’t warn him. would that be a sin?

Answer—“Doing good” means kindly deeds and not correcting others who would regard it as interference, and fail to appreciate your well-meant efforts. Why not turn the same faculty for criticism on yourself? Discard your own faults, which though different, may be worse than your neighbor’s. After all, the right example is far more potent an influence for good than fault-finding and admonition.

Question—Katherine M.: I am a university student and would like employment for next summer on a boat, cruising the great lakes. T)0 whom should I apply?

Answer—Some of the boats employ pianists. Enquire of the Superintendent, C.P.R., Great Lake Steamers, Windsor Station, Montreal, Que.