Women and their Work

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

EDWINA SETON August 15 1925
Women and their Work

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

EDWINA SETON August 15 1925

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

EDWINA SETON

NOTE: When a personal reply is asked for, a stamped, self-addressed envelope must be enclosed. No notice will be taken of anonymous communications. Writers must sign their names, not for publication, but as a guarantee of good faith.

Information about educational institutions and business places is confined to Canadian ones.

Doctor’s Assistant, Man.: Some time ago you wrote me regarding a new system of shorthand that could be learned very quickly. I have now found one, called Speedwriting, that can be acquired in from sixty hours to twelve weeks, according to the industry and capacity of the student. Only the characters of the alphabet are used. If you will send me your address, and a stamped envelope, I will forward you particulars of this correspondence course, which costs $25 or $30.

Question—Mrs. E. D. Sask.: You seem to be able to help a great variety of people who send in questions. Will you please help me also? Do you know of any Canadian firm dealing in fancy work supplies, who would send me a few articles each month to sell on commission. We have no such business in operation in this place, so that everyone sends to the larger stores for supplies. Thanking you in anticipation.

Answer—You might write to the following firms in Toronto that deal in fancy work supplies, although I cannot tell you whether they sell on a commission basis: Belding-Corticelli, Ltd., 79 Wellington W.; Wm. Shannon Co., 720 Bathurst; and Pugh Specialty Co., 38 Clifford St.

Question—A.T., St. Thomas: I have my senior matriculation and one year in Commercial, and would like to take a course for private secretary and get a good course in the languages.

Answer—It is difficult to give a satisfactory answer when so little explicit information is furnished. I suppose you have acquired shorthand and typewriting. If not, these subjects should be taken in a good business college, and followed by work as a stenographer in order to acquire the proficiency which comes only with practice. Languages you could take up in the evenings. If, however, you are free to continue your education without having to earn, you could seriously address yourself to the study of languages (every facility for this being provided in Toronto) and at the same time take a course in one of the business colleges here.

Question — A. C. D., Toronto Earnestly do I desire to become a first i class wholesale salesman, but how can I with the following difficulties in my way: Poor character, poor education,

poor talker, poor health, poor appearance and poor financially. I am 25 years old. Do you recommend a course in salesmanship? How can I improve my character?

Answer—Make it your first aim to get into a wholesale warehouse and learn the business from the inside. When there is a definite prospect of your being sent out on the road, it will be time enough to take a salesmanship course. Write to me then and I’ll recommend a course to you. Meanwhile join the Y.M.C.A. and cultivate athletics, especially swimming. Mix all you can with people, observe closely, not saying much yourself until you gain poise and selfconfidence. Join the Public Library and take out biographies of famous men who, have surmounted difficulties, such as Ben Franklin, the printer; Stanley, the explorer; Bernard Palisay, the potter; Cecil Rhodes the empire builder. There is nothing better for a deficient education than a good reading course. The librarians will be glad to help you to choose wisely. To improve the character there is no surer way than to follow the Golden Rule and “do unto others as we would have them do unto us.” This, if adhered to, will give that gentleness and courtesy that are the hallmarks of wellbred persons.

Question—Torontonian: I have heard of an artistic colony located somewhere in the New England States, where authors, artists and musicians spend the summer at a very low expense. Can you tell me where it is?

Answer—Mrs. Edward MacDowell, the widow of the eminent composer. | is the originator and head of this colony of artistic people at Peterborough, N.H. Last summer there were in residence I thirty-five writers, ten composers and five j artists. Guests to be eligible must be introduced by two of their own craft. \ Ten dollars a week is charged for accommodation amid ideal surroundings.