Women and their Work

MAKING CHOCOLATE FUDGE

INA WINIFRED COLWELL August 15 1925
Women and their Work

MAKING CHOCOLATE FUDGE

INA WINIFRED COLWELL August 15 1925

MAKING CHOCOLATE FUDGE

INA WINIFRED COLWELL

MANY the concoctions I have had passed to me in the name of chocolate fudge, and in like manner, many the concoctions I have passed out as chocolate fudge. Lately though, I have taxed my ingenuity and combined several recipes, eliminating here, adding there, until I feel that I have a recipe worth while—one that rarely fails, and is almost sure to be commended.

I remember attending a house party a year or so ago, and one member of our party suggested we take with us ingredients to make chocolate fudge. At the risk of losing our train we procured these; the result was even more awful than one could imagine. There was lots of confusion in making it, and as politely as I could, I refused a second piece. It made me realize why so many people claim they do not like homemade candy.

I like to use brown sugar—two cupfuls to one tablespoonful of rich cocoa. These I mix thoroughly with a pinch of cream of tartar, adding half a cup of liquid made up of cold coffee and milk, mostly the former. Care should be taken that the coffee is carefully strained; grounds might spoil the velvety finish of the fudge. The mixture is dissolved over a slow fire. Stir now and then to keep it in motion and, when thoroughly dissolved, increase the heat. Boiling should be uninterrupted until the soft ball stage is reached—that is, when the candy will hold together when dropped into a cup of cold water.

Here is the most ticklish part of the whole operation! Boiling too long makes the candy hard and it is almost worse not to boil it enough. Many prefer to use thermometers but, when these are

not available, the candy maker can^soon get to know the correct “string” or “thread” of the dripping syrup. When almost done, add a heaping teaspoonful of butter.

After the soft ball stage has been reached remove from the fire and pour into a deep dish and allow to cool slightly, : Add a few drops of vanilla flavoring and beat slowly and evenly with a fork. When it starts to cream add whatever quantity | of. coarsely chopped walnut meats you prefer—three-quarters of a cup is ample,

I think—and continue beating until it is too stiff to beat any longer. Mark off into squares and your candy is ready for you.

Candy that is a day old is much better in every way. I always try to let it stand overnight if possible—nor do I cut it until I am ready to use it. This is, of course, a matter of personal preference, but for those who prefer the softness of the fudge retained, I would recommend this procedure. Fudge will dry up when cut, just like bread.

Chocolate frosting is also much better when made with coffee. It is richer and smoother in appearance and the flavor bears no resemblance to coffee as one might imagine. The original flavor of coffee is quite lost, and it seems to bring out the flavor of the chocolate. It is the background of the picture, in other words. Cooks who have once used it generally have a spare bottle in which to pour leftover breakfast coffee—if it has not been made too long and become cloudy. Cold strained coffee presents a number of uses such as the above. One housewife suggested to me that I use it to make chocolate frosting. I went a step farther and used it to make chocolate fudge.