MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

NOTE: When a personal reply is asked for, a stamped, self-addressed envelope must be enclosed. No notice will be taken of anonymous communications. Writers must sign their names, not for publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. Information about educational institutions and business places is confined to Canadian ones.

EDWINA SETON June 1 1926

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

NOTE: When a personal reply is asked for, a stamped, self-addressed envelope must be enclosed. No notice will be taken of anonymous communications. Writers must sign their names, not for publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. Information about educational institutions and business places is confined to Canadian ones.

EDWINA SETON June 1 1926

MACLEAN’S QUESTION BOX

NOTE: When a personal reply is asked for, a stamped, self-addressed envelope must be enclosed. No notice will be taken of anonymous communications. Writers must sign their names, not for publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. Information about educational institutions and business places is confined to Canadian ones.

EDWINA SETON

Hooked Rugs—Will the lady who has these for sale, please send her address to 'the Question Box, as there is someone anxious to get in touch with her with a view to buying one or two.

Question—J.B., Winnipeg: Can you please inform me of any reliable institution where telegraphy and - the comptometer are taught in courses? I am a boy who will be leaving high school soon, and would like to get some idea of these two subjects and where taught.

Answer—The Dominion School of Telegraphy, Corner Yonge and Granville Streets, teaches telegraphy. As for the comptometer, this is not taken up in the business colleges, but if you will write to Comptometer Sales Agency, 32 Front St. West, Toronto, you can find out where such a course may be taken.

Question—Western Reader: Can you tell me if a complete list of books by Canadian authors can be obtained anywhere?

Answer—The nearest thing to this is an annotated catalogue of the five hundred books which were sent to Wembley Exhibition by Dr. George H. Locke, Chief Librarian, Public Library of Toronto. There are about 150 of these left, and anyone desiring a copy may have one 'by sending 25 cents, which is less than ■the cost of getting up such a catalogue. “It is,” writes Dr. Locke, “the nearest approach to a selected and carefully estimated list of Canadian books that has ever been published.”

Question—B.C. Enquirer: Will you please tell me how to become a member •of the Alpine Club of Canada. I would like to attend their summer camp this year.

Answer—The Secretary Treasurer of the Alpine Club of Canada is Mr. F. H. Mitchell, Sidney, B.C. Write him for ¡information. The club’s headquarters are in Banff, Alta, and branches exist in a number of our cities.

Question—J.W.: Can you tell me where to get materials for batik work, and directions for doing it?

Answer—Two English firms have representatives in Canada who can supply you with these materials. In Toronto the Art Metropole, 36 Adelaide St. West, are the Canadian distributors for Winsor & Newton Ltd., Eng., and handle their batik materials. There are also to be had Reeves’ batik materials, which I understand are on sale at the T. Eaton Co., Ltd.

Question—O.T.S.: I am a woman ■over the half-century mark. Have held a teacher’s certificate, taught for some years and enjoyed it. For last thirty-five years have been engaged in housekeeping and rearing my family. Now I am at liberty to do pretty much as I please. My children are living in different parts of the country. I visit them, enjoy it, but feel somewhat lost for an abiding mental employment. There are two avocations I should like to engage in—one to be a public speaker espousing particularly the rights of women and children—the other, to be an artist, which is a lifelong desire. Although probably now too advanced in years to take up painting from the life model, I could get considerable enjoyment out of landscapes. If I should go in for a public career, just what course of procedure would you advise?

Answer—Now that your children no longer need you, you are wise to develop your latent powers. Why not come to Toronto and take a course in Public Speaking at our University? That will give you a good grounding. Then prepare a lecture—the reference library here is splendid— and start by offering to give it free to church societies. This will give you confidence, and might be the starting point in becoming a lecturer to Women’s Institutes. While in Toronto, you could take lessons in art, pottery, sketching, wood carving, batik, etc., either at the Ontario College of Art or the Central Technical School. We are never too old to learn. Queen Victoria started the study

of Hindustani when around eighty. As a school-girl in Switzerland I recall seeing many women well past middle age engaged in the study of painting, and so happy in it. If you did not wish to come so far east, you could probably carry out some such program in Edmonton or Vancouver. But Toronto offers immense educational advantages, a great many of which are free.

Question—Widow, N.F.: Could you kindly give me information, or tell me where to apply for a mother’s allowance?

Answer—Write to the Mothers’ Allowance Commission, 46 Richmond St. West, Toronto.

Question—Mrs. J.: Where can I get a list of books suitable for a small lending library in a town of 500 population? Any help in conducting same would be welcomed. Would it be a paying occupation? In my case it would be more for a hobby.

Answer—I have sent you a list of publishers and magazines that feature book reviews. It is usual in such libraries to charge three cents a day for the loan of a book, limiting the time for reading it to seven or fourteen days, according as the book is in demand. You might combine afternoon tea, candy and novelties with the library, making the place inviting. As a hobby it would be interesting—as a paying proposition, doubtful.

Question—C.B.R : Please give me the value of the following list of coins, putting it in your next issue.

Answer—It is impossible to print a reply in the “next issue.” Usually a couple of months should be allowed for an answer to appear. We do not valúate coins, but if you will send your list, with stamr for reply, to George H. Lowe, Richmond St. East, Toronto, he will tell you the value of the collection. However, glancing over your list and seeing such entries as English penny of 1890 and the same of 1908, I hardly think they are worth more than their face value.

Question—Edmonton Reader: Will you please send me a picture, cut from a magazine, of William Lyon Mackenzie? Answer—In the same mail came a request for a couple of plays, for catalogues—and now a picture. We do not furnish such things. Indeed it would be hard to find such a picture as you want. The search would involve a great deal of work.

Question—J.A.C.: What is the proper way to word a resignation? Is there in Canada a school where a girl can take a course which would give a training along social lines, and make her a social success? Is a summer course given?

Answer—In wording a resignation the main part should run something like this. “I hereby beg to tender my resignation from the post of........to take effect the........, as I intend shortly to take up my (work or residence) in........” Training along social lines comes from experience—meeting people in a social way, and not from tuition. However, a good preparation for social success is the acquirement of complete ease, selfpossession, poise and harmonious physical development. These can be attained by a course in dramatic work, physical culture, swimming, riding etc. Also courses in cultural subjects should be taken up, and in connection there would be many opportunities for a young student to acquire social contacts. In the summer the best way would be to get a good wardrobe, learn to play bridge well, and go to a fashionable Muskoka hotel.

Question—C.S.. Alta.: I once saw in your column something about a school for dental nurse-training in Canada, and would like to know very much where it is?

Answer—The Royal .College of Dental Surgeons, 240 College Street, Toronto, has such a course of training. Write to the Registrar for particulars.