Home Beautiful

Something New Under the Sun

Excursions into the realm of new ideas in decoration always are refreshing

ANNE ELIZABETH WILSON October 1 1927
Home Beautiful

Something New Under the Sun

Excursions into the realm of new ideas in decoration always are refreshing

ANNE ELIZABETH WILSON October 1 1927

Something New Under the Sun

Home Beautiful

Excursions into the realm of new ideas in decoration always are refreshing

ANNE ELIZABETH WILSON

NEW ideas are an inspiration, even though one may not choose to adopt them in their entirety. Merely to go through a great shop and ‘take in’ things is refreshing, even though one may purchase nothing. By the same token, it is the interest of ‘something different’ that makes it worth while to survey the field of innovation in decoration, periodically. Though there may be nothing among the latest decorative schemes, which one may wish to embrace entirely, there may be a suggestion or an adaptation which will help solve some problem of home-making or beautification.

The Popularity of Wrought Iron

"VXTROUGHT-IRON has been growing steadily in * V importance as a decorative medium of late. Some of the exquisite workmanship which is now being accomplished has brought it almost to the quality of metal lace. It is being used extensively for exterior house hardware and trimming in grilles, porch-railings, window-guards, and all the appurtenances of windows, shutters and doors —such as hinges, locks, latches, knockers and lanterns.

Within the house, its delicacy of design and flexibility of treatment have brought it into very widespread use. Wrought-iron fire dogs are procurable in almost any type of design, from the most fanciful filigrees to the sternest of gargoyles. One of the advantages of wroughtiron as against other metals in fixtures, is that it is possible to have it designed and executed in whatever style, pattern or motif you wish to carry out in a room, at very little more cost than purchasing a ready-made piece. There are craftsmen established in almost every sizeable Canadian city, capable of carrying out such work.

Aside from fireplace sets, there are candlesticks, lighting fixtures, ash trays and ash stands, curtain rods and window cornices. A very effective metal window cornice in wrought iron is shown here. Other wrought metals are very often combined with iron, such as brass, steel and bronze, but are usually employed only as a decoration or contrast. No other metal seems to combine the high

degrees of malleability with durability which Repossesses. It is a strange paradox, too, for we usually think of iron as the most ungiving of metals.

Innovations in Fabric

rT"'HE new art, that movement which keeps forcing itself upon us in spite of ourselves, is responsible for the introduction of oilcloth as a decorative fabric. Do not let that word call up in your mind the prosaic kitchen standby, which is the form in which it is most commonly recognized. The art oilcloth is a sophisticated relative of the shelf and table coverings of our usual ken. Two varieties of this lately glorified material are now being utilized for decorative purposes. One, the heavy type, resembles patent leather more than a fabric. It is the same sort of heavily glazed cloth which is sometimes seen in bedroom slippers, shopping bags, and suitcases. This is being used for chair, or stool, seat coverings and cushions in brilliant shades. Usually, it is a very durable and adaptable material, virtually impervious to water and almost equally impervious to wear, if so applied that it does not crease. Cracking is its only drawback.

If it i» used on cushions and rounded surfaces, however, this should not prove a problem.

The other type of oilcloth of decorative calibre, is best described as practically identical to the transparent, highlycolored raincoating material now so much seen. As a hanging fabric it is really most effective. You can readily see its decorative possibilities in the dining-room photograph here shown.

There are places where the use of this material is practical and very pretty. One, I might suggest, is the bathroom, as a shower-bath curtain, or this fabric may be used for window curtains of kitchen or bathroom, especially in view of the fact that it can be washed with a damp cloth.

For these, of course, the more delicate shades will be used. In a man’s study or library, in deep rich tones, its straight tailored lines and smart sheen are appropriate and in keeping. Men of the house have an aversion for velvets and even chintz sometimes! For a doctor’s, or any professional office, it would be excellent.

Washable Walls

IT is now possible to buy wall paper of any pattern, suitable for the most formal room, or, again, the kitchen, the nursery or the bathroom, in washable form. That is, one may approach it with soap, water and cloth and sluice it down to one’s heart’s content without the slightest fear of damage. Even the

scenic papers coming in broad widths covering half a wall, are procurable in waterproof form. They are slightly more expensive than the ordinary papers, but their advantages speak for themselves. They are not necessarily very thick, or heavy, and seem to have no tendency to lift, blister or peel. A waterproof scenic is also shown in the accompanying dining room photograph.

Fancies in Glass

THE very latest and most modern note in decoration, however, is the utilizing of glass, mirrors and alabaster for various effects. Mirror-topped dining, drawing-room and dressing-tables are

now not unusual—and truly, they' are lovely! Imagine the reflected light of candles, the gleam of glasses and silver on your dining-table . Mirrors also are being used considerably as back plaques or appliques for electric wall brackets—of course, giving just twice as much brilliancy to the light. Frosted glass and alabaster bowls are used for lamps—the last word in indirect lighting. Glass, lampstands half filled with tinted water are being enthusiastically received—and we have even seen one or two that hold goldfish! Far fetched? Well, there'you are—something new under the sun! ‘You pays your money and you takes your choice’—or perhaps you go home and put an electric light behind the old blue goldfish bowl and call it a day.