REVIEW of REVIEWS

Levine Receives Queer Requests

Famous Trans-Atlantic Flyer Describes Letters Which Pour in on Him.

CHARLES A. LEVINE November 1 1927
REVIEW of REVIEWS

Levine Receives Queer Requests

Famous Trans-Atlantic Flyer Describes Letters Which Pour in on Him.

CHARLES A. LEVINE November 1 1927

Levine Receives Queer Requests

Famous Trans-Atlantic Flyer Describes Letters Which Pour in on Him.

CHARLES A. LEVINE

SINCE Levine, the New York banker, and Chamberlin made the longest non-stop aeroplane flight in history, Mons. Levine has, at all times, been very much ‘news’. As a result of this feat, his mail has been of quite unusual interest. In an article, which recently appeared in the Daily Moil (London), he describes some of the letters he has received and, incidentally, pays a gracious tribute to the courage and skill of the British airman. We read:

‘Apparently there are many people on this side of the Atlantic who are just now being specially attracted to aviation, for I have been rather embarrassed by their letters.

‘Among those who ask to accompany me on my next flight—whether it be to New York or to any other distant place —are about a hundred women.

‘Some of their letters are quite amusing. One go-ahead lady says, for instance: “I hope you will take me with you, because I want to get into the movies.” ‘Another says: “If you won’t take me with you, please announce to the newspapers that I want to go, so that I shall get some publicity.”

‘I guess this lady ought to make good! ‘The men who want to fly with me are as enthusiastic as the women. Many of them, too, are thinking of the “movies,” it seems. A young London hairdresser who sends me his photograph and suggests that he is good-looking enough for Hollywood asks: “Will you fly me straight to Los Angeles so that I could begin my film career right away?”

‘Dozens of English and German pilots want to fly Miss Columbia—a nephew of the great Bismarck among them.

‘From everywhere I have received mascots, ranging from four-leaved clover to models of St. Raphael, the patron saint of airmen. One old fellow has sent me a piece of metal which he declares will prevent my machine from being struck by lightning if it is fixed to it. A German countess has sent me a photograph of herself in her bathing-dress. She wanted to fly to New York with me, so I suppose she thought she would need a bathingsuit!

T have received innumerable pieces of advice regarding my next flight. One anxious correspondent urges me, for instance, to take with me a “safety trunk of his own invention. He points out that if I came down into the ocean I would simply have to lock myself in this trunk and float for ever!’