Women and their Work

MacLean’s Question Box

EDWINA SETON December 1 1927
Women and their Work

MacLean’s Question Box

EDWINA SETON December 1 1927

MacLean’s Question Box

EDWINA SETON

NOTE : When a personal reply is asked for, a stamped, self-addressed envelope must be enclosed. No notice will be taken of anonymous communications. Writers must sign their names, not for publication, but as a guarantee of good faith.

Information about educational institutions and business places is confined to Canadian ones.

Question—E.C.: Can you tell me of any school or college that gives correspondence courses for Grade XII in Saskatchewan?

Answer—Yes, there is a very successful correspondence college that does this. I have sent you the address.

Question—H.G.: Do you know of anyone who understands steel engravings? I have an old Bible in two immense volumes, illustrated by a large number of beautiful steel engravings. Where could I sell these engravings?

Answer—Steel engravings have practically no value nowadays. You could probably get a better price for the Bible complete with illustrations than by selling the engravings separately. I have sent you the address of an expert on old books, who will tell you the value of your Bible.

Question—H.C.: I am a boy of eighteen, working as a farm hand, but dislike farming very much, and know for a fact if I stay farming I shall be nothing but a hired man all my life. I want to go to Toronto to work and attend night classes. Can you tell me where I would be most likely to get a job—preferably in a small store?

Answer—On coming to Toronto, register at the Employment Service, which is a free employment bureau of the government. To get work you should also scan the advertising columns of the daily papers. It would be wise to have enough money to keep you for several months.

Question—M.P.: Has the Normal course in Ontario been changed to two years instead of one?

Answer—Yes, but the two years need not be consecutive, as it is permitted to teach school in between.

Question—Mrs. M.P.: Can you suggest any way by which I could make a living for myself and little girl aged two years? I have done a good deal of teaching and believe it is something for which I am well suited, but other qualifications are almost nil. I have little or no money to start with.

Answer—A private school for children from four to eight years would be your best chance, I think. Study the matter from every angle, then approach parents in a good residential district and see if you can enroll pupils in advance. If so, you could probably arrange to get your school equipment on terms.

Question—H. P.: I am a teacher in a tiny, one-roomed school on the banks of the M— River. I want some pictures for my school and the board has given me money to buy some, but we cannot afford frames. I thought of passepartout and then using the thin paper that comes in candy boxes to protect the pictures from dust. Can you tell me where to get this?

Answer—I find that sheets of thin, transparent celluloid are sometimes used to cover pictures. You can get this for thirty cents a sheet from the British Xylonite Co., Canada, Ltd., Federal Building, Toronto.