Brickbats and Bouquets

A Big Compliment

January 1 1930

Brickbats and Bouquets

A Big Compliment

January 1 1930

Brickbats and Bouquets

A Big Compliment

Editor, MacLean’s:

Must say a word for MacLean’s short stories. They are the elephant’s earrings. I always see them first. The serials of late

are “yes.” The “articles” on Canada are mighty fine reading.—V.R. Smith, Ingersoll, Ont.

Against a White Ground

Editor, MacLean’s:

As a third-generation Canadian, I, in company with many others, would continue to use the Union Jack as my national flag, no matter what new design were selected as distinguishing Canada alone. “One life, one fleet, one Flag, one Throne,” is the sentiment which should animate and unite all units in the British Empire, which is a greater thing than any of its parts.

We recognize, however, that some of the arguments in favor of a Dominion ensign have weight (always with the Union Jack combined), especially as we have more or less permitted the use of the merchant marine ensign since Confederation. The simplest design, and to my mind far the best submitted some years ago was the Union Flag with a large maple leaf at the junction of the Crosses, if that were correct in heraldry. But whatever the decision may be eventually, let me as a woman protest against any design of which the larger part is white. One can easily visualize the result of the weather on ordinary occasions, or national decorations on such an emblem, and in the hands of school children the “Canadian Flag” would be always soiled.

Do not let us exchange the “Union” representing a thousand years of glorious history for what might become known as the dirtiest bunting in the world.—M.C., Montreal.

But They Wore a Maple Leaf

Editor, MacLean’s:

I have read with much interest the article dealing with the Flag question and many of the letters written upon this very important subject. In this question of Canada’s status and nationhood and our right to a distinctive flag, one very important feature is always overlooked, viz., the majority (actually, I think %) of the men who formed Canada’s army were born in the British Isles and we maintain, and we think with every right, that having fought as Britishers in Canada’s army we shall have some voice as to the future of Canada. The Union Jack has sacred traditions and memories for us, and having fought for it and under it, I cannot see the necessity of a separate flag. When I see it flying at the top of the “mast” it brings a glorious feeling of pride. Let’s keep the good old flag. —H. A., Hamilton.

From China

Editor, MacLean’s:

Perhaps it might interest you to know that most of our Canadian missionaries here are of the opinion that your magazine has greatly improved during the past two or three years, and that it shows a real progressive spirit.—Rev. James Neave, Ching Tu, Sze, China.

There Are Difficulties, Of Course

Editor, MacLean’s:

So much has been said and written regarding a distinctively Canadian flag, that it is easy to see the possibility of friction that will engender a spirit of animosity and bitterness, which might be with us for generations.

Why not let his Excellency the Governor-General, the Prime Minister, Mackenzie King, and the Honorable R. B. Bennett, leader of His Majesty’s Loyal Opposition get together and decide the matter one way or the other for all time to come.

These three men represent all that is necessary of organized authority and opinion, and their united decision would be pretty generally accepted by the country at large.—M. McGregor, Ruthilda, Sask.

The First Horse

Editor, MacLean’s:

In the article by John Hurley, “From Sombrero to Cocked Hat,” it is stated that Mr. McGregor pulled the first horse taken into the country through his first winter. With all due respect I would inform Mr. Hurley that horses were in the country several years before George Cormack discovered the diggings on Bonanza Creek. You see I happen to know, for I was one of the “handful of N.W.M. Police” who went in under Inspector Constantine in 1895. The year

before, 1894, Inspector Constantine and Staff Sergeant Brown were sent by the Dominion Government into the Yukon. On their way they camped with one Chris Sonniksen, at the mouth of Sixty Mile River, who told them it was no use going on to Forty Mile, but if they would stay with him he would give them ten dollars a day cutting hay for his team of horses. These he had brought in over the Dalton Trail the year before.

Again, the story of the San Francisco paper is rather dubious, for there were lots of papers coming into the country both in 1897 and 1898, in spite of no regular mail.

It is common knowledge that Mr. McGregor did good work, and I do not want to belittle that.—P. C. Engel, ex-Sergt. N.W.M.P., Edmonton.

We Don’t Agree With the First Paragraph

Editor, MacLean’s:

Personally, I believe most of the agitation on the flag question is backed by non-native born residents and by residents of the Province of Quebec who have their own reasons for pushing the subject.

I notice your Mr. Savage does not appear to be a native citizen. We of the Maritimes take pride in being British and would strongly oppose any change in the Flag.

I wish to congratulate you on the continued excellence of your publication, MacLean’s, and on its efforts to develop a sturdy Canadianism. I know several people who have given up the Saturday Evening Post in favor of your excellent publication. Yours for a better Canada. — D.H.T., Moncton, N.B.

Yes, Beef is Coming Back

Editor, MacLean’s:

MacLean’s issue of October 1st contains an article written by Charles Lugrin Shaw entitled “Beef is Coming Back,” that is of more than passing interest to Canadians generally, as the re-development of this basic industry, if conducted along intelligent lines, would help in solving many perplexing problems now confronting producers, consumers, transport and financial interests; and if our farmer.' can be induced to measure up to the importance of the occasion by producing in quantity and quality beef animals to feed the constantly increasing population of Canada and the Motherland, they need not worry whether the threatened Hoover tariff ever becomes effective or not, as these two permanent markets can absorb all the beef animals that we can produce for many years to come.

According to reports prepared by specialists charged with the responsibility of mapping out the sources of future meat supplies of Great Britain, there would appear to be a world shortage of beef animals. Shipments of dressed beef from the Argentine are expected to drop very considerably in the immediate future, for the reason that large tracts of the best grazing grounds have been turned into grain fields. While grain shipments are expected to increase, beef shipments are expected to decrease. Another reason for decreased beef shipments from the Argentine is due to the persistent spreading of foot and mouth disease among cattle. The losses occasioned through this scourge, appear to have been the deciding factor for the change from cattle to grain raising.

What lesson do these world production changes convey to Canadian Farmers? “It is this,” that while our supremacy as the principal grain exporting country is being seriously threatened through development in other countries, we have the healthiest country in the world in which to breed, and feed, meat animals of the highest quality. We also have the capacity to extend production indefinitely. We are only ten days sail from the largest consuming markets of the world.

Here lies Canada’s opportunity to become the Larder, as well as the Granary of the world. Strict attention to breeding, feeding, transport, and, above all, continuous supplies, are the essentials needed to ensure success. All these are within our reach. Are we prepared to move?—Donald Munro, Montreal.

Likes Sandwell Article

Editor, MacLean’s:

This is just a line of appreciation of your journal, which I devour twice a month with great relish. I wanted to tell you that I liked Professor Sandwell’s article, “The Great Canadian Fallacy,” very much. He talks sense, according to my philosophy and thinking. Canada needs a balanced development.

Your articles on Flin Flon, Down North and other Canadian Northern districts are great.—S.B.S., Ottawa.

Thanks for B. K. Sandwell

Editor, MacLean’s:

Your magazine is read and enjoyed, but does not often drive us to writing. The article, “The Great Canadian Fallacy,” by B. K. Sandwell, has done this. It was splendid. The controversy over “Why People Leave the Farm,” never worried us. The answer is easily found after reading this unusual, interesting and truthful account —“One of the Least,” Bath.

Apologies Are Diminishing

Editor, MacLean’s:

MacLean’s gets better and better. It is the sort of magazine all true Canadians have yearned to see. No longer can anyone complain of being unable to buy a first-rate magazine produced at home. I find in Canadian homes more people apologizing if they don’t take MacLean’s, and I always let my acquaintances feel the apology is fully called for.

The fiction I don’t trouble much about. The articles and contributions are for the

most part above criticism and written in the best British spirit, the spirit of “silent service” Major Drew talks of.

I hope Major Drew will be oft and long with us. It is the sort of thing to place before a growing boy for whom one has a father’s ambitions and anxieties.

A. W. Blue gives one long and serious thought, too, and wields an influence in the home all too sorely needed in many homes these thriftless days.

Occasionally one finds an article written in the style of “The Eternal Superlative” of other imported Brass Band magazines and then I feel sorry as one feels for a friend.

With all my soul I wish you well and the success you have very justly earned. —E. A. Holt, Stony Plain, Alberta.

Even Now We Don’t Feel Humble

Editor, MacLean’s:

A short time ago your magazine printed an article attempting to justify a distinctive Canadian flag; and articles have appeared in other Canadian papers which would indicate a quiet but persistent propaganda to that end.

Your magazine to which, by the way, I am a subscriber, is evidently conducted on American lines, which assume the efficiency of a continued raucous paean of self-praise and exaltation of Canadians and Canada, the wonderful things they are doing, the wonderful things they intend to do; all in the true blustering, boasting style of the United States, and their publications.

This flag incident is therefore quite in keeping with the self-conscious spirit which papers like yours would tend to instill into the Canadian youth.

—A British Citizen, Born in Canada (Montreal).

Applause for Stefansson

Editor, MacLean’s:

I read the article by Vilhjalmur Stefansson with much interest. He is quite right regarding the lack of information in our school books regarding the vast plain beyond latitude sixty. I resided in Dawson for nearly four years and saw a good deal of that northern territory, hence my letter of approval. MacLean’s Magazine is doing Canada a great service and I trust you will keep the good work going.—H.S.C., Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.