REVIEW of REVIEWS

Aerial “Cops” Police the Sky

Fast Pursuit Planes Repress Joy-riders and Criminals Above New York.

T. J. C. MARTYN August 1 1930
REVIEW of REVIEWS

Aerial “Cops” Police the Sky

Fast Pursuit Planes Repress Joy-riders and Criminals Above New York.

T. J. C. MARTYN August 1 1930

Aerial “Cops” Police the Sky

Fast Pursuit Planes Repress Joy-riders and Criminals Above New York.

T. J. C. MARTYN

THE air policeman is here. Writing in the New York Times, T. J. C. Martyn describes what Manhattan is doing to cope with the stunt merchant and the dangerously low flyer over the city; moreover, he prognosticates a romantic future for the police plane in keeping pace with the inevitable increase in the mobility of the criminal.

"Once again,” he writes, "we are brought face to face with the fact that the march of progress has been outdistancing civilization, and the result is we are beginning to have laws governing aviation, and police in planes to enforce them.

"New York’s air police are making a modest beginning. In time, it is not to be doubted, their duties will increase in number and complexity. For the present they are patrolling daily the outskirts of Manhattan. If a pilot be so bold as to descend below the legal altitude of 2,000 feet while flying over the city, a fast amphibian plane significantly marked P.D. and carrying the city’s coat-ofarms will flash into view alongside him. The air policeman will probably do nothing more than take the offender's number and on his return to earth charge John Doe, flying airplane D.C.X. 1943, with contravening the air traffic regulations. It is then a simple matter for the police to trace the plane, find out who was flying it and serve the necessary summons,;

"The police air unit has two planes in service. Both of them are amphibians for use in general patrol work. The remaining plane, a fast pursuit type, will, when it has been delivered, be kept in reserve for emergency work. All planes will be manned by two police pilots, one to do the actual piloting and the other to act as observer and radio operator.

"Thus it is possible for a plane out on patrol to receive instructions direct from Police Headquarters in exactly the sames way as patrolmen on them beats receive directions from precinct headquarters. And thus a crook escaping with lus booty in a high-powered motorboat from the harbor may be surprised to find a swifter amphibian racing alongside him. Thq ominous P.D. will be sufficient warning for him to stop; if it is not, a few shots from i machine gun may be more compelling. Once the launch has stopped, the amphk bian will land, taxi up and take off the offender under arrest.

"It is apparent, that the air service division of the Police Department will have a general duty of co-operating to the best of its ability with other police units. Those most likely to need the assistance of the air police are the detective and marine divisions. Where knowledge of a crook fleeing by any vehicle whatever has been received by detectives, the air police may be counted upon to overtake him and probably to bring him back.”