REVIEW of REVIEWS

Photography Made Easier

New “Fast” Film is an Aid to Both Amateur and Professional Camera Users.

REVIEW OF REVIEWS July 1 1931
REVIEW of REVIEWS

Photography Made Easier

New “Fast” Film is an Aid to Both Amateur and Professional Camera Users.

REVIEW OF REVIEWS July 1 1931

Photography Made Easier

New “Fast” Film is an Aid to Both Amateur and Professional Camera Users.

REVIEW OF REVIEWS

A NEW type of photographic film, about three times as “fast” as the film now in use, has recently been invented. It will make photography easier for the amateur who can take good snapshots on sunny days but not on cloudy or rainy ones; it will lessen the amount of eyestraining artificial light now required in motion-picture studios; it will have many other advantages. Review of Reviews says: “The increased speed and extraordinary color sensitivity of the new film are expected to be of particular usefulness in naturalcolor photography, where the great concentration of light hitherto necessary has been a drawback.

“Another practical advantage claimed for the supersensitive film is an increase in the possible ‘depth of focus’ in sound-film photography. The use of incandescent lighting made desirable the wider opening of lens diaphragms to let additional light into the cameras. This, in turn, greatly diminished the range within which the actors could move and yet remain in focus. When sound came to the movies, depth of focus became of increasing importance, because it is irritating to audiences to hear a clear voice coming from an out-of-focus actor.

“With the greatly increased speed of the new film, it will henceforth be possible to ‘stop down’ lenses, increasing the depth of focus and thus permitting greater latitude to directors in moving their actors about before the camera. The characters will no longer have to remain in a narrow plane at a fixed distance from the lens under penalty of blurring into the background or becoming fuzzy in the foreground.

"An alternative advantage of the new film is the possibility of reducing the amount of light to one-half or one-third the present quantity.

“A further characteristic is the greater ability it will give news-reel cameramen to make pictures under difficult conditions, both at night and in daylight insufficient to make clear pictures.

“Prize-fight pictures, taken under incandescent lights, will be better, and previously impossible indoor-action scenes, like hockey and basket-ball, will become possible. Successful motion-pictures of action on a theatre stage, photographed from the balcony, were made during the tests that preceded announcement of the film—a feat considered difficult.

“Industrial photographers are often faced with difficulty in obtaining sufficient artificial lighting for subjects such as ‘long-shots’ of factory interiors or close-ups of machines with operators. Flashlights are banned in many plants—although the new photoflash-lamps have entirely eliminated smoke and the fire hazard. Since the supersensitive panchromatic film is especially efficient under artificial light, plant photography is obviously simplified. Much less artificial illumination is now required. This is valuable in several ways.

“First, that the amount of necessary lighting equipment is reduced.

“Second, that the amount of the electric ‘load’ is cut down.

"Third, photographers will no longer be required to clutter areas in which work is being done with large numbers of heavy lamps, and thereby avoid hampering general factory operations.

“Fourth, where the usual amount of artificial lighting is available, much shorter exposures are possible. This is valuable in arresting the motion of people or moving objects. If shorter exposures are not required, smaller lens stops can be employed to increase sharpness and 'depth of field.’ ”