REVIEW of REVIEWS

Queer Food From the Sea

Fried Squid and Other Odd Sea Animals Considered Delicacies in France

HAROLD G. CARDOZO November 1 1932
REVIEW of REVIEWS

Queer Food From the Sea

Fried Squid and Other Odd Sea Animals Considered Delicacies in France

HAROLD G. CARDOZO November 1 1932

Queer Food From the Sea

Fried Squid and Other Odd Sea Animals Considered Delicacies in France

REVIEW of REVIEWS

HAROLD G. CARDOZO

QUEER foods which are practically unknown in Canada and Great Britain are favorites in other countries, according to The Daily Mail (London) which, in an article by Harold G. Cardozo, states: “Frogs and snails are often thought of as the typically strange foods which France has to offer the tourist. Their novelty, however, has waned in the past few years, and there are few British visitors to France who have not tasted these delicacies, probably for the first time in fear and trembling, to discover that they are quite good, and to become enthusiastic gourmets after a few essays.

“France has, however, a number of other dishes which are rarely, if ever, to be found in England and which in many cases offer quite distinct attractions of their own.

“Wild boar and all forms of venison are during the season quite a frequent dish throughout France. Venison, of course, we have occasionally in England, though not as frequently as in Paris, where during the winter and early spring practically every gamekeeper’s shop displays three or four whole carcases hung up like so many sheep at the butcher’s, but still bearing their skin.

“Only the other day I partook of a dish of roast wild boar at a country house where I was visiting, The animal had been shot in the near-by osome days before. Very young wild boar, called marcassin, can in the autumn lx roasted and eaten without other preparation; but the ordinary boar’s flesh is somewhat tough and, therefore, usually has to be pickled for a few days Ixfore Ixing cooked.

, “Another queer dish, which is common also to Spain and Italy, is fried squid. The smaller octopuses are chosen for this, skinned and cut into small pieces, and then beaten to make them tender. Dipped in batter and fried in hot oil they make a most delicious fish course, and I defy anybody who has not been told beforehand to distinguish them from the best filleted fish.

“At the present moment dandelion salads are in season. Wild dandelion is plucked for this purpose later in the year in the country but the variety now being eaten is a cultivated form of the plant.

“Watercress, which we only eat as a salad, is most commonly consumed in private households in France in a very tasty form oí soup. Of course, soups have always been the great pride of the French family cook and the plain and simple forms which are eaten throughout the country are as delicious and often more tasty tlian all the crèmes which figure on restaurant menus.

“There is the plain leek soup with potatoes and butter and milk, and the famous onion soup, with the onions browned and the crusts and grated cheese baked on top. This is mainly a supper dish, and thousands of them are consumed in Paris about the hour of midnight from Montmartre to Montparnasse. Then in the country there is the nettle soup, which has a flavor all its own. It is made from the young shoots of the common nettle weed cut fine.

"The great pinky-yellow pumpkins which can be seen sprawling their huge bulk in most French market gardens also make a favorite soup which can only be rarely tasted in England.

“Langouste, or crayfish, is rarely eaten in England, and British and FYench fishermen often meet in the Channel or the North Sea and exchange to their mutual advantage lobsters for crayfish. River crayfish, too, are not to be found on English tables, while the French will eat not only dogfish, known as Youssette,’ which is a form of small shark, but a host of other sea animals.”