Review of Reviews

Radio Helps Symphonies

Famous Conductors Wll Present Concerts Over the Air This Autumn Season

October 15 1934
Review of Reviews

Radio Helps Symphonies

Famous Conductors Wll Present Concerts Over the Air This Autumn Season

October 15 1934

Radio Helps Symphonies

Famous Conductors Wll Present Concerts Over the Air This Autumn Season

MUSIC-HUNGRY radio listeners-in, rushing at the opportunity, have contributed $65,390 to the guaranty fund for the New York Philharmonic-Symphony Society, or thirteen per cent of the $503,000 required to maintain the society’s concerts through three more seasons, according to The Literary Digest. This astonishing response has caused the society to lay out the programmes so that the concerts will take place on Sunday afternoons and the radio public will get its share of musical dividends.

With the donations were letters which set forth the individual contributor’s likes and dislikes. A large percentage of these letters favored Wagner, and three Sunday afternoons will be devoted to his music. Bruno Walter will conduct the Wagner concerts, and the programmes will include the entire first acts of “Die Walkuere” and “Siegfried,” the final scene of “Die Walkuere,” and the Good Friday scene from “Parsifal.” Metropolitan artists who will sing, but not act, are Lotte Lehmann, soprano; Paul Althouse and Marek Windheim, tenors; Friedrich Schorr, baritone, and Emanuel List, basso.

Walter will have six weeks with the Philharmonic-Symphony—December 9 to January 13 inclusive—during which he also will conduct Mahler’s famous “Lied von der Erde” and introduce three soloists to American audiences: Artur Schnabel, pianist;

Bronislaw Huberman, violinist, and Emanuel Feuermann, violoncellist. It was Schnabel who refused last season to broadcast from a radio studio, saying: “I would just as soon play for fifteen persons as for fifteen million!” Walter seems to have altered that view.

The peak of the symphony season will be reached when Arturo Toscanini conducts a Brahms cycle. Six Sunday afternoons will include in their programmes four symphonies of the German master.

Toscanini is right now in general acceptance the ranking orchestral interpreter. Even in Italy, where his anti-Fascist sympathies make his name unprintable even in the newspapers, he is known in speech as primo del mundo. He will conduct the dosing concert April 28 with a repetition of Beethoven’s “Missa Solemnis.”

Outstanding novelties in the season’s schedule will be Igor Stravinsky’s “Symphony of Psalms,” inspired by the Thirtyninth (verses 12-13), the Fortieth (verses 1-3), and the Hundred and Fiftieth (entire) Psalms in the King James Version; Mahler’s “Lied von der Erde,” as mentioned, and the suite by the Russian composer Shostakovetch—“The Nose,” an opera.

Otto Klemperer, banished German conductor, will have charge of the performance of the Stravinsky work composed in 1930 “to the glory of God and dedicated to the Boston Symphony Orchestra.” A tone curiosity, the score omits violins and violas, adds wood-winds and two pianos to “give an excellent strangeness” to the three contrasting moods: prayer, thanksgiving and praise.

Werner Janssen, young American conductor and composer, will conduct “The Nose,” as well as the Sibelius Fifth Symphony, MacDowell’s Piano Concerto, with another young American, Beverly Webster, as soloist. He also will conduct Ferde Grofe’s tone-poem based on Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle.”