EDUCATIONAL

Youth’s Brave New World

ALMA LAWRENCE CODE July 15 1936
EDUCATIONAL

Youth’s Brave New World

ALMA LAWRENCE CODE July 15 1936

Youth’s Brave New World

EDUCATIONAL

ALMA LAWRENCE CODE

IN THIS specialized new world the problem of education is one on which parents spend many thoughtful hours. It is no longer simply a matter of sending one’s child to school and letting the State turn out a product finished in an average mold. Now we have learned that each child should not be set to the same task, nor should we expect all to learn easily the same lesson.

While the private schools in Canada carry only a small percentage of the nation’s children, their pupils annually constitute a very large percentage of the honor matriculants.

To begin with, private schools have only the authority of their own Board of Governors to obtain before introducing new teaching methods, new subjects, or any general improvements, and as a result are a constantly alert and mobile educational force.

The classes are generally smaller than those in public schools, so that the child has the conceded advantage of more attention from the teacher. Thus the parents know that not only is the child’s daily work constantly supervised, but that as well a pretty accurate test is being made of his or her capabilities, and a judgment made as to an eventual vocation. And the judgment of highly efficient, earnest men and women is sure to be much sounder than that guided only by mother love or the insistent wish that the boy shall follow in the paternal business.

If a boarding school is in the order of the child’s life, there is no gainsaying the necessity of a private school. These schools are invariably beautifully situated, the buildings have dignity and charm, wide greens surround them. Secure from home or social distractions, the child settles into a nicely competitive field, stands on his own feet, makes his own choice of friends, has regular hours for meals, for sleep, for study, for recreation. He finds himself adopting school traditions which are pleasantly British, his mind expanding with the wider range of interests, his body developing from the splendid physical training ... at the end of the first term his parents recognize a certain justification for the ancient claim that parents cannot educate their child . . . youth must have its own field to grow in . . . and finally, that the world belongs to him !

Maclean’s Magazine is proud to endorse the schools advertised on this page and to commend their particular advantages to parents who will in the immediate future be facing the all important question of educating their boys and girls.

To those of our readers who experience difficulty in selecting for their sons or daughters a school to meet their needs, Maclean s will give individual attention to each request for information or advice on this important matter.

All letters should give complete information concerning age of boy or girl, religion, previous education, type of school desired, preferred location and the contemplated expenditure.