In the Editor's Confidence

In the Editor's Confidence

April 1 1938
In the Editor's Confidence

In the Editor's Confidence

April 1 1938

In the Editor's Confidence

WHEN big news breaks, readers often overlook the fact that magazines cannot be produced with the speed of a newspaper, and magazine editors wish to goodness they could be.

When Anthony Eden split with Prime Minister Chamberlain over Mussolini and resigned the Foreign Secretaryship, we were swamped with calls from people who wanted to know what Beverley Baxter thought of it all.

Without waiting to be prodded, and without any regard for expense, we had cabled Mr. Baxter asking him to cable his article instead of mailing it. He did so and caught this issue, which, at the time of writing, will not be in your hands for another twenty-five days.

However, in spite of the elapsed time, “Why Eden Quit,” on page ten, remains news, for the repercussions from the crisis which Mr. Baxter likens to that of the Abdication, will be sub' jects of live discussion for many months to come.

Mr. Baxter sides with Chamberlain and makes no bones about it.

(jj ON SEPARATE occasions we discussed Holly' wood with two English actors who were going there to work in pictures. On the stage, both of them could be deliciously mad. But each was rather timid about Hollywood. They had heard the picture business was crazy. However, they went. They are still there. They seem to like it. Certainly the movie audiences like them. One is Eric Blore. The other, Reginald Gardiner. We live in hope that we shall one day receive from them their True Confessions concerning that fantastic Land of Make-Believe. Meanwhile, we can chuckle over “Voice Off Scene,” which has its premiere on page seven of this issue. It took two authors, Herbert Dalmas and Maurice Geraghty, to handle this particular slice of Hollywood, and it is obvious that they had a good time doing it. It shows what can happen when the tender passion is fanned by machinery, and how a ham actor can lie made a star by having someone else sing while he moves his Kps. Hamish, the composing-room messenger, snorted when he brought the proofs up. He asserts that Messrs. Dalmas and Geraghty ought to have their heads examined. But Hollywood is a tender subject with Hamish. He is in love with Myrna Loy.

(jj IN ONTARIO, Premier Hepburn's diligence in probing estates for succession duties has filled no small number of people with qualms. Not many of them have millions to bestow, but even those who can afford to give their wives a car or their daughters a fur co,it are wondering if, when they are gathered unto their forefathers, such gifts will result in their heirs being dragged before some sort of an Inquisition. So we asked Frederick Edwards to

see what he could do about setting forth the pros and cons of the situation. On page twelve, in “Mr. Hepburn’s Treasure Hunt,” Mr. Edwards presents the result of a number of interviews with people concerned.

(jj ON PAGE thirteen, J. C. Hendy presents Maclean s all-star hockey team for the season just ending. The selection is made by votes of the managers of the eight teams in the National Hockey League. No one manager knows how another manager is voting. And no other committee of judges is in a position to know as much about the players’ performances as do the managers. That the all-star team will fail to please some fans goes without saying. Which will be all right with us. After all, what is the use of having an all-star team if you can’t argue about it?

(jj THERE MAY be people who can look at the pictures on pages fourteen and fifteen without batting an eyelid. It takes all kinds to make a world. As for us, any picture showing a man under the sea, attacking a shark with a knife, whets our fiction appetite. In the case of Garnett Radcliffe’s story, “Springs of Courage,” and Ralph Pallen Coleman’s pictures, we had an advantage over the reader in that we knew before we saw the illustration that Terence Riley (the man with the knife) was terrified of sharks. Which emphasizes his bravery. At that, Terence was no braver, in a way, than the little Irish girl he left behind him.

“Most Wise, Most Subtle Kingly Mountain.”

If you think that that is no way to talk to an elephant, just wait until you h,ive read “Chundra” on page sixteen. Having done so, we feel sure you will agree that Kudrat was a master of understatement. Paul Annixter, of course, is one of the world’s best writers of animal stories.

(jj WE SUPPOSE she has been long in retirement, but about twenty-five years ago there was a staunch and very small ship named the Tees which used to carry supplies up the West coast of Vancouver Island. We knew some cable and wireless operators who travelled to and from their posts on her. They would turn a sickly greenish hue when they told of the Tees' gyrations and of the trouble they had in being put ashore on that turbulent coastline. All this came back to us when we read Charles Lugrin Shaw’s article on page nineteen. Up on that same wild and rainy coast, gold has been found. And the story of the Zeballos “rush” is inseparable from the story of frowning mountains, sea-battered strips of beach and weeping skies. Anyone who himself wrests a fortune from Zeballos will deserve it.

In “Little Corporals of Finance,” on page eighteen, C. W. McGannon writes whimsically of the joys and sorrows of a junior bank clerk in a small town.