In the Editor's Confidence

In the Editor's Confidence

May 1 1940
In the Editor's Confidence

In the Editor's Confidence

May 1 1940

In the Editor's Confidence

IT WOULD have to happen on the first day to give us hope that spring might be on the way. We could actually hear the drip of melting snow. There were pools of water in the streets. We had an ear cocked to catch the first twittering of the birdies. Then it happened. In came a letter from Carl Schmidt, of the Kitchener Daily Record. It said:

“Dear, Oh, Dear!—Never did I expect to see Maclean's—Canada’s National Magazine—pull such a boner ! Tsk! Tsk! Your April 1 issue lies open at page 11. 1, as a member of the Clan of Schmidts— although no relation to Milt—rise to protest the publication of ‘Porky’ Dumart’s picture and labelling it ‘Milt Schmidt.’ Tsk ! Tsk ! Tsk !”

O, the Tragedy of It. The bitter, bitter tragedy. For what Mr. Carl Schmidt says is too, too true. In publishing pictures of our specially selected All-Star Hockey Team, picked by the managers, we did print Milt Schmidt’s name and Mr. Dumart’s face. We shall not apportion the blame publicly, for our Art Department lias suffered enough. We shall just take it on the chin (after all, look how Dr. Manion took it) and apologize. We apologize to Milt Schmidt. We apologize to Mr. Dumart. We apologize to hockey fans everywhere. And so saying, we vanish into the outer blackness, crushed.

#On page seven of this issue, there is presented a most unusual tale—“The Super Sub-Hunters,” by that famous English writer of sea stories, Weston Martyr. It is definitely a piece of fiction, with no plot. It is a description of the hunting of a German U-boat by a new type of British naval craft specifically designed and scientifically equipped for that job. We are informed that it has “elements of truth,” and that the manuscript was passed by the Admiralty Section of the British Ministry of Information, and by the Censor as “not giving away anything to the other side.” It gripped us, and whether you want to regard it as fiction with a knowing look, or just plain fiction, we think you’ll find it extraordinarily interesting.

Before and since turning to writing, Weston Martyr has had a wide experience of the sea. In the merchant service he has sailed in square-rigged sailing ships and steamers, and he has made long ocean voyages in y adits of all sizes. In writing ‘‘The Super Sub-Hunters,” he had some assistance from Lieutenant L. B. Luard, R.N., who is also well known in England as a teller of tales of ships and seamen.

• Accompanied by a young lady writer of our acquaintance, a well-known Toronto military man was on his way to a party given for Rosita Forbes, who recently made a trans-Canadian lecture tour. “Now,” said the officer, “tell me something about this Rosita Forbes. It seems to me that I have heard that name somewhere before.”

His companion, somewhat stunned, started to explain that Mrs. Forbes is a world-famous explorer and writer, a Fellow of the Royal Geographic Society,

an honorary member of the French, Royal Italian and Royal Antwerp Geographic Societies; that she conducted expeditions to Kufra, Libya, to Abyssinia, to Asir and other Arab countries; that she drove an ambulance in France during the last war; that she has interviewed dictators and leaders in many lands; that she is the author of many books and hundreds of articles.

That is what our friend started to explain. She didn’t get very far, because the moment she uttered the word “Arabs,” a great light illuminated the countenance of the military man. “Ah !” he exclaimed, “did she write ‘The Sheik’?”

Rosita Forbes didn’t. But while she was in Toronto, speaking to packed audiences, we did arrange with her that she would write some articles for Maclean's The first, “What Canada Means to Me,” appears on page fifteen of this issue, and forthright stuff it is. In it she tells what such people as Hitler and Stalin have tucked away in the back of their minds.

#When Frederick Edwards went to Windsor to write about what makes that city tick, he found it a pleasantly paradoxical place. For instance, it is south of Detroit. It also is north of the United States. And you’ll lie surprised to learn how many other things are made there in addition to automobiles. Then there is the story of the famous city merger, and how many people in Walkerville just refuse to believe that it exists. Y'ou will find “South of the Border,” on page twenty, an intensely interesting article. Incidentally, when you read that Windsor is the fourth largest city in Ontario, coming after Toronto, Hamilton and Ottawa, you might like to have by you the fact that the latest census estimates give Ottawa a jxjpulation of 142,851 and Windsor 102.a'39.

#There are two stories in this issue which concern animals, but they are vastly different. In “Pottsy,” Don Tracy’s story on page twelve, there figure Donal O’Blaingowrie, a Scotty dog, and a large dog named Whitey, who was no sissy either. They do things, these two, not only to each other, but to the lives of the good-looking girl and the nice man who own them. On the other hand, Henry Anton Steig’s story, “Tondar,” on page sixteen, deals with the things that can happen when five and a half tons of paincrazed elephant go haywire, and how a circus man can solve problems a zoo cannot.

#The lives of many soldiers in this war will be saved by blood transfusion. Ted Sanderson tells you all about it on page eleven. Our own Politician With a Notebook, on page fourteen, surveys the backstage results of the election. Beverley Baxter’s London Letter appears on page ten. And on page twenty-four Arthur Lowe tells the story of Frank Lucas, a young man who has built up a big business making model airplane kits.