War Oddities

War Oddities

May 1 1940
War Oddities

War Oddities

May 1 1940

War Oddities

Two Dollars will bp paid for rach War Oddity accepted and published in this column. Address contributions to War Oddities, Maclean’s Magazine,

IX! University Ave., Toronto. Source of tlie information must be given.

Having heard so much lately about the “new” method of marching in threes, I was interested to read the following in chapter Seventy-six of Walter Scott’s “Tales of a Grandfather.” Writing of the time of 1745, he says:

“The Highlanders were familiar with a species of manoeuvring exactly suited to their own irregular tactics. They marched in a column of three abreast, and could wheel up with prompt regularity in order to form the line, or rather succession of clan columns, in which it was their fashion to ¡ charge.”—Malcolm McCallum, Agassiz, ¡ B.C.

German insurance company actuaries, in their first “Expectation of Life” tables published after the war started, give the expectation of life for a submarine crew member as SIXTY-TWO DAYS.

This speaks volumes for the efficiency of the British Navy.

The blackout is revealing some of the peculiarities of human eyesight. Many people with acute vision in daylight, find themselves blundering babes in the darkness, while the myopic go along the darkened streets quite comfortably.

Some wearers of glasses are finding that doing without them in the blackout makes a great improvement. The tip is particularly useful in cities and towns where moving shadows and lights cause confusion by being reflected in the lenses.

The Irish have a village called Pettigo, which is half at war with Hitler and half neutral. The border between Northern Ireland and Eire cuts the village in two. ! So if you live in belligerent Pettigo you get a gas mask and identity card, have to blackout at night and pay war tax on your whisky. If you live in neutral Pettigo you encounter none of these war measures.