War Oddities

War Oddities

Two Dollars will be paid for each War Oddity accepted and published In this column. Address contributions to War Oddities, Maclean’s Magazine, 481 University Ave., Toronto. Source of the information must be given.

January 1 1941
War Oddities

War Oddities

Two Dollars will be paid for each War Oddity accepted and published In this column. Address contributions to War Oddities, Maclean’s Magazine, 481 University Ave., Toronto. Source of the information must be given.

January 1 1941

War Oddities

Two Dollars will be paid for each War Oddity accepted and published In this column. Address contributions to War Oddities, Maclean’s Magazine, 481 University Ave., Toronto. Source of the information must be given.

Statistics show that after every major war, births of boy babies in the warring countries increase. Nature apparently likes lo keep the sexes balanced.

A.R.P. authorities report little trouble with cats. At the first hint of the siren, pussy gets up and scoots for the darkest cellar.

Few casualties have been reported.

Because flower shows were not officially held last year in Scotland, residents near the East Coast towns made up for the loss by a magnificent display of blooms on many of the Anderson air-raid shelters in the gardens.

Returning from the country, finding his house destroyed by a bomb, a man searched among the ruins and came across a book. The title was: “Minor House

Repairs and How to Effect Them.”

On bleak Dartmoor the women who can ride horseback are rendering invaluable service. They are the Dartmoor “Mounties”—attractively dressed in riding kit. Two by two they patrol the southern slopes of Dartmoor, keeping a lookout for “enemy intrusion.”

German soldiers and farmers are busy teaching the German language to horses requisitioned from France, Poland, Belgium and the Netherlands.

Girl workers in a Derbyshire, England, factory are to go stockingless, the money saved as a result to be given to war funds. They expect to save $5.000 a year for war funds by going barelegged.

A North London housewife digging potatoes on her allotment uncovered a big root of potatoes perfectly cooked in their jackets. She dug deeper—and found a partly burnt-out incendiary bomb. The potatoes were fit for the table.

The Hotspurs, a northeast concert party, claim to hold the record for a single night’s voluntary entertainment—nine hours, almost unbroken, from 7.30 p.m. until 4.30 a.m. They performed first before 500 troops, then during an alert they gave a three-hour concert in a shelter. They were caught in a raid when finally they reached home, so it meant another twohour concert in a shelter.

Just before a London couple was to be married, the girl’s home was bombed. Next, the would-be bridegroom’s home was demolished. Finally, the church in which they were to have been married was reduced to rubble. They got married anyway.

In a Surrey town, a London reporter found Mrs. A. Giddy, a centenarian who does not know Britain is at war. Her family do not wish the closing years of the woman’s life to be shadowed by such

thoughts and avoid mention of the subject. Occasionally Mrs. Giddy hears bomb explosions but is told the noise comes from artillery practice.

Off Dover, the sea gulls, by screaming, give warning of the approach of enemy airplanes long before the sound can be detected by human ears.

A peer in the Home Counties had a ten-acre field where his cows grazed, but which was less useful than it might have been because it was waterless. A short

time ago the Germans dropped a bomb there, which most conveniently brought to light a hidden spring.

Farming districts in England have a head cowman who is the “animal A.R.P. warden.” His duty is to rush to the farm where a German bomb has dropped, and help put any animals that are injured out of their misery.

A woman who saw a mouse in her airraid shelter in Southern England announced she would sleep there no longer. She slept in her home and so did her family. That night a bomb blew the shelter to pieces.

Vic Oliver, well-known English revue star, was asked how his show at the London Hippodrome had been affected by air raids. “On the last night,” he replied, “we sent the audience home in a taxi.”