MACLEAN'S EDITORIALS

Get Rid of Rats

October 15 1941
MACLEAN'S EDITORIALS

Get Rid of Rats

October 15 1941

Get Rid of Rats

MACLEAN'S EDITORIALS

LABOR’S concern with the outcome of the war should be obvious enough.

There are no unions under the crooked cross. No maximum hours. No minimum wage. No choice of work or location. No freedom to speak. No rights.

Wherever Hitler has triumphed the workers have been made serfs and the bullet-torn bodies of protesting leaders added to the mounds of soldier and citizen dead.

Even were a German military conquest confined to the other side of the Atlantic—which is by no means the limit of Nazi ambition—the resulting economic battle would shatter the North American living standard, destroy all that labor has attained.

The bulk of Canadian labor knows this.

It knows, too, that several hundred thousand of the country’s finest young men have given up everything to fight for the security of all Canadians against that menace. It has its share of sons, brothers, workmates, in the Army and Navy; is hit by names in mounting Air Force casualty lists. It knows well enough the sacrifices made, earnings abandoned, homes broken, by those who have responded to the call of duty.

It knows that this war is essentially a war of production; that fighting men without equipment are rendered impotent, are slaughtered.

With all these things so evident, it is astounding that Canadian labor has not itself cracked down on the imported racketeers who, for their own cynically selfish ends, have been engineering minority strikes which have seriously impaired war production in this Dominion.

The Financial Post quotes one of these gentry, a C.I.O. agitator, as brazenly telling its reporter:

“It’s none of my business if a strike that I call interferes with war production. This war has given me a chance I never had before and that I may never have again, and I am going to take advantage of it.”

That this type of sabotaging thug should ever have been permitted to cross the border is an affront to every man in uniform, to every decent worker. He and his unsavory ilk should either be booted back to where they came from, or be slapped behind barbed wire.

And Canadian labor should have been first to voice this demand.

Surely it cannot be content to watch alien agitators deliberately block this country’s war effort in order to feather the nests of racketeering gangsters across the line.