In the Editor’s Confidence

In the Editor’s Confidence

May 1 1941
In the Editor’s Confidence

In the Editor’s Confidence

May 1 1941

In the Editor’s Confidence

THE other day, we were discussing the war with a lady of firm character. She was boiling. She

was blistering mad at the Germans and impatient with herself. She said, "I'm the sort of woman who hasn’t patience to sew or knit. I want to drop bombs, myself, with my own hands!"

We ventured the opinion that, laudable as was her ambition, there were several difficulties in the way. But we added that while she might not be able to fly over enemy territory and press a bomb release, she actually was handing bombs to airmen who would deliver them—she was buying bombs via her War Savings Certificates.

At the moment, we had on our desk the manuscript of the article by Bruce Hutchison which appears on page eleven of this issue of Maclean s. We read portions of it to the lady, and she brightened visibly. She went away feeling that she was actually doing something personally to make Hitler’s head ache.

There are a lot of Canadians who feel just as our visitor felt. They cannot get into uniform. They cannot fly a bomber or fire a gun. But they have a consuming urge to get at the Hun. They are giving their money till it hurts, yet they find it difficult to relate that giving and lending to actual physical assault on the enemy.

The simple fact is that such an assault would not be possible without their backing, and Mr. Hutchison, in "How Your Dollar Fights,” drives home that point with some striking illustrations.

#There is no escaping the fact that ships have definite personalities. Two ships may be built from the same plan. They may be identical in construction to the last rivet. And yet at sea the behavior of one will differ entirely from the behavior of the other. No landlubber can ever hope to fully understand the affection of a skipper or a crew for some particular ship, even when she consistently refuses to act like a lady. Now Lieut.-Commander Swede Murphy may have been in command of the U.S. destroyer Galloway, but a large part of his affections remained aboard his former command. So it was that when Swede encountered the Brent flying the Canadian ensign and observed a German submarine preparing for dirty work at the cross-roads, his emotions and the then official “short of war” policy of his government became somewhat involved. But there is one law of the sea which never is broken by Anglo-Saxons. And you will thoroughly enjoy the telling of it in Allan R. Bosworth’s story, “Short of War,” on page seven.

# Douglas Reed, surveying “The Battle of 1941,” reaches the conclusion that Britain’s greatest peril now seems to be a German invasion of Eire, which would place the enemy between Britain and the United States. His forthright article will be found on page ten. On page sixteen, in his regular London

Letter, Beverley Baxter tells of the recent journeyings of Anthony Eden, and of the unprecedented responsibility vested in that young statesman by Winston Churchill. It may be that the whole future course of the war will rest on the decisions made in the Balkans by the man who started a vogue in hats.

#The love me love my dog theme has done yeoman service in the fiction field, but we hand it to Newlin B. Wilde for freshening it up in “Psychology and Mr. Floto,” which amusing story you will find on page fourteen. We won’t admit that “Mr. Floto” is our idea of a good name for a dog, but in this case the dog itself—one of those where - do - we - go - from - here chaps —is very much all right. At any rate he prevented an attractive young girl from making a sad matrimonial mistake.

#The second installment of John Coulter’s story of Winston Churchill is on page twelve. Answering a request for further information concerning Mr. Coulter, he was born in Belfast in 1890. As a ycuthful art student he went to Dublin and thence to London. For some years he was co-editor, with John Middleton Murray, of the New Adelphi magazine. From the beginning of radio broadcasting he was associated with the British Broadcasting Corporation. He was in charge of all “spoken word programs” throughout the experimental stages, and worked out the first feature programs presented over the English air waves. He also broadcast tennis and rugby football matches from Wimbledon.

In 1936, Mr. Coulter moved to Toronto. He has written innumerable articles for leading reviews and is the author of two plays, “The House in the Quiet Glen,” and “Family Portrait.” The first act of the latter work is used as a textbook on play construction and acting by the famous Abbey Players of Dublin. As we stated while introducing Mr. Coulter’s first article on Churchill, he became interested in the British Prime Minister’s career when he roomed with an artist who was teaching Winston how to paint.

#On page seventeen, Leslie Roberts enables you to become acquainted with Premier Godbout of Quebec, who, since he took the reins of government in that province has shown himself to be a man of considerable strength.

#With things beginning to pop in the Balkans, Russia is still the enigma of the world situation. What is happening within the Soviet Republic? What are the forces at work? What is likely to happen? In our next issue these questions are answered by G. E. R. Gedye, for some years the Moscow correspondent of the New Aork Times. Mr. Gedye’s article was mailed from Istanbul.