THIS IS WHAT WE THINK

This is Spirit

December 1 1942
THIS IS WHAT WE THINK

This is Spirit

December 1 1942

This is Spirit

THIS IS WHAT WE THINK

A CANVASSER for the Third Victory Loan told us this.

In an office he approached a young, pretty, five-foot stenographer and asked her how about a bond.

“I’ve got to buy one,” she said, “but I don’t know how I’m going to pay for it.”

Tactful questioning revealed that she and her sister looked after their widowed mother; that they sent parcels to their two brothers, one a prisoner of war in Germany, the other a prisoner in Hong Kong. After her board was paid, she had $1 a week for clothes; twenty cents a day for lunch. She had given up smoking. Already she was paying for a Victory Bond from the previous loan and wouldn’t be clear of that till December.

“Why do you think you have to buy a bond?” the canvasser asked.

“I’d feel like a heel if I didn’t,” she told him, and signed on the dotted line.

The salesman went to the head of the firm for whom the girl worked. He agreed to finance Bond Number Two until she had finished paying for Bond Number One.

There are a number of stories like that. They add more than one can tell to the news that the original objective of Canada’s Third Victory Loan has been passed and that it seems sure (as we go to press) that the billion dollar figure will be reached. They will bring added cheer to the men of the Canadian forces overseas, and patrolling the seas; comfort to those at home who have lost their sons.