WOMAN’S PAGE

EAT and Be HEALTHY

"If every Canadian ate these foods in these amounts every day, there would be no nutrition problem in Canada"

HELEN G. CAMPBELL April 15 1942
WOMAN’S PAGE

EAT and Be HEALTHY

"If every Canadian ate these foods in these amounts every day, there would be no nutrition problem in Canada"

HELEN G. CAMPBELL April 15 1942

EAT and Be HEALTHY

"If every Canadian ate these foods in these amounts every day, there would be no nutrition problem in Canada"

WOMAN’S PAGE

HELEN G. CAMPBELL

Director, Chatelaine Institute

3 Glasses of Milk 6 Slices of Vitamin. rich Bread with Butter 1 ServIng of Meat or Fish I Egg or an egg three or four times a w~k 1 ServIng of Potqtoes 1 Serving of Green. leaf or Yellow Vegetables Glass of Tomato Juice Serving of Vita. nrlnrlcb Breakfast Cereal The Daily Essentials Milk supplies calciwn. high quality protein and three im portant~ vitamins. Whole-wheat bread. or bread made with Canada Approved flour supplies the B v*tambs. and also an economical source of energy. Meat supplies high quality protein. iron and several viLe mins. Fish protein Is as valuable as meat protein. Salt water fish supplies Iodine. Eggs supply high quality prOte1n~ Iron an4 the B vitamins. Potatoes are a cheap source of Vitamin C and of energy. Fresh, canned or fresh-frozen vegetables supply Iron and Vitcuuins A and C. Canned tomato juice or canned tomatoes strained and served.cold supply Vitamin C. (Wbole.graln cereal or cereal enriched with a$nerals and vitamins.) These types of cereals supply the B vitamins andiron.

IT ISN'T enough these days to be vaguely interested in nutrition and to collect odds and ends of

information about the vitamins in this or that food. If we’re going to feed our families well we have to know the rock bottom essentials of a healthful diet, and we have to translate that knowledge into the day’s meals. Nutrition has to be an applied science before it can do anybody any good.

But the thing that sticks many housekeepers is the difficulty of sorting out all they hear and read on

the subject. Happily though, the whole business can be simplified. So I asked Dr. E. W. McHenry, Head of the Department of Nutrition, School of Hygiene, University of Toronto, to do just that for us. Here’s his answer—a list of foods which, if we eat them every day in these amounts, will provide all theminerals, vitamins, protein and other necessary nutritive elements.

Don’t think, for land’s sake, that you can never put another bite of anything into your mouth. This is the basic diet; you can add to it and

you can vary no end the form of serving these essentials.

Milk, for instance, can be used as a beverage and in cooking many dishes. Eggs may be poached, scrambled, cooked in the shell, or used for ingredient purposes. Bread may be an accompaniment—plain or toasted. Some of the daily ration may be used in puddings and toppings for creamed dishes, and in other ways.

For meat you can have the variety offered by different kinds and cuts. Then, too, there are poultry, salt-water and fresh-water fish and

such meat substitutes as dried peas and beans.

Potatoes are preferably baked or cooked in their jackets. Serve them as a vegetable or as part of a dish.

Yellow and green leaf vegetables include many varieties which lend themselves well to different ways of cooking and serving. Don’t overcook them, whatever you do, and remember to use one of them raw frequently.

Good food is the means of arming Canada with health and energy. Go to it, housekeepers!