In the Editor's Confidence

In the Editor's Confidence

May 1 1942
In the Editor's Confidence

In the Editor's Confidence

May 1 1942

In the Editor's Confidence

BY THE time you read this the world will know whether Sir Stafford Cripps’ mission to India has ended in success or failure. What happens at New Delhi may affect the course of his star. But, judging by what Garry Allighan tells us on page five of this issue of Maclean’s, whatever happens the Cripps chin isn’t likely to be de-jutted. In a turbulent political meeting he has stood without batting an eye as a broken bottle whizzed past his head. In response to urgings that he leave by a back door to dodge a menacing crowd, he has said, “I came in by the front door, and I am going out that way.”

It’s a new portrait of the man that Mr. Allighan swiftly sketches, and the lines are drawn from his own observation. As you might suspect from the sound of it, Garry Allighan is Irish. He has worked in Fleet Street, for Beaverbrook, and in the British radio field. For a time he was in Canada, on the staff of the Toronto Telegram. Returning to London he became interested in the Labor movement; was elected to the London County Council on a Labor ticket, and was closely associated with Cripps in the latter’s political campaign at a time when tempers were hot and the aim of bottle hurlers uncomfortably close.

#The Pacific War Council, on which Canada has representation, has been engaged in laying down a broad strategy for the defense of the Southwest Pacific against further Japanese inroads, and for an eventual United Nations’ offensive against the enemy. Three articles in this issue have a timely ' bearing on this strategy. After the Council’s initial meeting, Dr. T. V. Soong, Chinese Foreign Minister, said, “We will be coming to grips with the whole war situation more and more now.” Dr. Soong’s country has been holding its own against the Japs for four years. It has paid, and paid heavily, in blood. And Dr. Soong’s opinions carry weight, demand attention. On page eleven there is an interview with him, recorded by R. T. Elson. Mr. Elson, formerly news editor of the Vancouver Province, has for some time been Washington correspondent for the Southam newspapers.

On page fifteen Richard Harkness, Washington correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer, deals with the strategy planning

referred to above. Obviously, he cannot divulge details of what the strategy will cover, but he does deal with something essential to the United Nations’ effort— the maintenance of the five great world-girdling routes over which allied supplies must travel.

The third article, cabled from Australia by Clive Turnbull, of the Melbourne Herald, tells of the regulations and restrictions by means of which the full weight of the Commonwealth’s people is being mobilized.

#The “Little Red School House” of industrial warfare is something to gape at. It has been enlisted under the War Emergency Training Program and it’s a night and day school. The example Frederick Edwards uses on page sixteen is Toronto’s Central Technical School. Normally it has 6,084 regular students. Today it has

I, 135 extra students taking special courses of instruction that will equip them for jobs in our war factories. The school works round the clock in three shifts: from 8.45 to 3; from 3.30 to

II. 20; from 11.30 to 7.30 a.m. Western and other tech nical schools in Toronto and other cities are operating on similar lines; operating to the whirr of lathes and the splutter of welding torches, and with an intentness on the part of overal led students that would amaze a peacetime pedagogue.

#As you read Flight Commander Gale’s unvarnished account of the strange disappearance in Libya of Flying Officer Marcus Vasey, you may agree with the explanation that strain or sunstroke had caused Vasey to conjure visions of the past, but that won’t account for a lock of golden hair tied with a beaded thread of lapis lazuli perfumed with rose. We haven’t room to make this any clearer, but W. E. Johns’ story, “Lost Oasis,” page eight, amplifies what is a fascinating problem.

#Our next issue will be the fourth of the series featuring the various divisions of Canada’s war effort. It will present a bird’s-eye view of our Industrial Front. The story is not only that of machines, but of men and women, of their adaptability, of science and ingenuity. In short, it will be a human interest chronicle, illustrated with striking, dramatic photographs.