In the Editor's Confidence

In the Editor's Confidence

July 1 1942
In the Editor's Confidence

In the Editor's Confidence

July 1 1942

In the Editor's Confidence

YOU will have noticed, of course, that the picture on the front cover of this issue is reproduced in black and white instead of in color. We propose to do this on each first of the month number, alternating, for the present, with natural color shots. For some time we have been wanting to get a topical tie-in of cover pictures with current events and personalities, and the fact that the circumstances which surround the taking, processing and reproduction of color photographs are not conducive to speed, particularly in wartime, has not sufficiently advanced that ambition. So we have taken half a plunge.

The subject of this July 1 cover was decided on because it seemed to us that the Speaker of the House of Commons symbolizes those things for which Dominion Day stands, for which the democracies are battling, and which the peoples under Nazi, Fascist and Japanese rule do not possess. The House of Commons was established as the channel of government by and for the people, through freely elected representatives. And ’ the Speaker is the traditional guardian of its powers, its dignities, its liberties.

Elonorable James Allison Glen is Canada’s twentieth Speaker. Born in Scotland, he came to this country in 1911, became a barrister in Manitoba, was elected a member of parliament in 1926, and chosen Speaker May16, 1940. Photographer Karsh improved our idea by taking the Speaker in the act of reading prayers. Said Mr. Karsh, “That’s something that doesn’t happen in the legislatures of enemy countries.” The four pages shown in the picture are, from left to right, Laurent Sequin, Jean Claude Rodier, Walter Milne and Jean Burke.

®This Dominion Day has an added significance. It’s the nation’s seventy-fifth birthday. On page five Bruce Hutchison, in “Milestone,” not only looks back at the problems which confronted the people of the infant years of Confederation, but. frankly examines the problems which today bear heavily on our national unity. Incidentally, the activity of this Hutchison man leaves us panting. Since he completed his recently published book, “The Unknown Country,” he has -written a long piece on John W. Dafoe for Fortune, a series of articles on the Ottawa scene for various Canadian newspapers, maintained regular

service to his own newspaper, the Vancouver Sun, and kept hopping about from Ottawa to Washington to Toronto to Ottawa to Vancouver Island.

#Some time ago, in introducing the newly discovered young author of a very amusing tale, “Gup, the Stuttering Pup,” we mentioned that at twenty-three Len Peterson had worked as a waiter, a theatrical scene designer, a delivery boy, radio announcer and deckhand on a ship. Now he’s in the Canadian Army. Almost his final civilian act was to deliver “Look at Those F'aces,” the story which appears on page ten of this issue. It is vastly different from Gup; adds writing versatility to Mr. Peterson’s accomplishments.

# Personally, we laughed and laughed over Leslie, McFarlane’s narration of the hectic events recorded in “The Cat Called Claudius,” page fourteen, and we have a notion that you won’t be able to keep a straight face either.

We have in the past thrown considerable light on the career of Mr. McFarlane. The time has come when we ought to bring up the subject of a potential competitor within his own family circle—his eight-year-old daughter, Norah Anne. Norah Anne is an indefatigable writer of verse, the kind of verse which sort of creeps in and cuddles up. For instance her poem “It’s Nice.”

It’s nice to be in your own warm house

When the storms are raging high !

It’s nice to be in your own warm house

When the rain pours from the sky.

It’s nice to be reading a story book

Of gallant knights afar,

When the wind is shrieking and howling loud

And the sky is black as tar.

Then there’s her description of the Busy Bee, who, after a hectic day, winds up by “Filling the Drone’s private pipe, Dressing the Queen in her white lacy garments, Or fixing her hair for the night.” And of the rabbit:

He leaps ahead Like a shooting dart,

His drumming feet Stir not a leaf —

He’s safe! He’s safe!

Oh, what relief!

Mac wall have to look to his laurels.