Review of Reviews

Life for Tires

It's Worth Time and Money to Ensure Proper Repair of Blow out - producing Punctures

May 15 1943
Review of Reviews

Life for Tires

It's Worth Time and Money to Ensure Proper Repair of Blow out - producing Punctures

May 15 1943

Life for Tires

It's Worth Time and Money to Ensure Proper Repair of Blow out - producing Punctures

Review of Reviews

WITH ALL automobile owners searching for ways of prolonging the life of their tires, Scientific American suggests that greater attention should be paid to puncture holes in the fabric of the tire as well as those in the tube: the more the matter of conservation is studied—the plainer it seems that repairmen and owners alike have been badly overlooking one of the greatest of all causes of tire destruction.

Nobody, least of all the owner, could be particularly blamed for it, because the average driver sees only the outside of his tire and doesn’t realize that the tread of a tire is only its wearing surface. So the owner, who probably never sees the inside of a tire carcass, has not realized that the most important part of a tire is really the inside fabric, which constitutes its one source of sufficient strength to outwear the tread.

A checkup of tires which recap men have had to turn down because it wouldn’t pay to retread them shows a small percentage with sidewall cracks caused by underinflation, and another small percentage of breaks caused by some such accident as running against the curb; but the great majority had to be turned down because of fabric damage. A small puncture may apparently be fixed by repairing the tube but water forced into the fabric soon rots it. Water rot spreads, making a bulge which further destroys the fabric and finally a blowout results.

Since theaverageautomobileowner, when his tire shows a leak or a puncture, simply drives to a repair shop to have that “flat fixed” at a charge usually of about fifty cents and doesn’t want to pay any more, the dealers cannot be blamed very much if they finally give up trying to get the owners to do any more than take care of the puncture by means of a pasted-on rubber patch on the tube and possibly a similar one pasted on the inside of the casing, neglecting entirely to do anything about the puncture where the tread of the tire and its fabric had been cut.

Every tire repairman has his way of sealing such a break in the casing so that water will be prevented from working into and rotting the fabric. Otherwise a blowout will result.

The big thing is that punctures are much more common than most people realize. Ordinarily it is quickly fixed and the owner soon forgets about it. More than one man will tell you that “I have never had a puncture,” although his tires are nearly two years old. That is simply because he has forgotten about it or someone else was using the car at the time. The chances are that inside inspection will show that anywhere from three to eight punctures have been received by his set of five tires.

Considering that present tires will have to last for a long, long time, it seems that the feeling of security alone of having all tires carefully inspected inside should be worth more than its cost. If fabric water rot from punctures is started, taking care of it without delay means a lot more mileage from that tire than it could possibly give otherwise. And this care can be given only by removing the tire and sealing the hole. Naturally, the tube would be inspected at the same time and quite often this will show the starting of a rim or a bead cut which—unless taken care of—will soon result in practically destroying it.