In the Editor's Confidence

In the Editor's Confidence

January 15 1944
In the Editor's Confidence

In the Editor's Confidence

January 15 1944

In the Editor's Confidence

ACCORDING to RAF terminology, Flight Lieutenant Coleman Perkins, DFC, has

led a normal life. The basis is that when things are in a mess and the immediate future looks as black as India ink, an aircrew says “Situation Normal” and carries on with the job. F/L Perkins returned to Canada recently (his home is at Fonthill, Ontario) after a lengthy operational tour as wireless operator; a tour which, to our way of thinking, had been crammed with variety and excitement. He had participated in numerous minelaying expeditions in enemy waters (which the RAF calls “gardening”); had been in umpteen major bombing raids over Germany. For Maclean’s, Gordon Sinclair went to interview him; reported back that the situation was normal in that Perkins didn’t think he had anything interesting to talk about. Also being normal, Gordon hung on. With the result that by turning to page five you may learn what it feels like to take off for Bremen with a green pilot at the controls; to be caught in a blizzard of enemy fire; to be in a Lancaster compelled to land with a 4,000-pound bomb still stuck in the bomb bay. As a description of shaky does, this is pukka gen. In fact it’s ticketty boo. And if there isn’t an airman handy to explain what we mean, drop us a line and we’ll tell you.

QSince the Canadians landed in England, 16,000 of them have married British girls. From time to time Canadian girls (and their mothers), mistaking us for Dorothy Dix, have written to ask WHY so many Canadian men should marry British girls when there are so many eligible girls at home. In our lame way we have had to reply that we could only suppose that in the majority of cases they have fallen in love with them. Now, on page ten, a British war bride speaks out. We withhold her name—she is in this country now—but we assure you that the article is genuine. She tells why she married her Canadian, why British girls find Canadians likable and different, and what it feels like to come to this country as a war bride and for the first time meet in-laws and also Canadian girls, some of whom feel in a vague way that they have been gypped.

^Were you to ask any newspaper man or diplomat in London, Washington or Ottawa if he knows Lester B. Pearson, it is altogether likely that he would look blank. If you said “Mike” Pearson he would instantly beam like the midsummer sun. Reasons for the popularity of the Minister-Counsellor of the Canadian Embassy in Washington

(he is also chairman of the Supply Committee of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration) are set forth in R. T. Elson’s sketch, “Dynamic Diplomat,” on page 7. When he wrote it, Elson was Washington correspondent of the Southam newspapers. Now he is Canadian editor of Time.

Last issue we presented the program of Le Bloc Populaire as seen by its leader, Maxime Raymond. In this issue we record an opposite French - Canadian viewpoint supplied by Edmond Turcotte, chief editor of the Montreal morning newspaper, Le Canada.

In company with two other Canadian newspapermen, B. T. Richardson, Ottawa press gallery correspondent of the Sifton newspapers, recently toured Australia. In “Destiny Down Under” he gives his impressions of the war and postwar problems of our Commonwealth sister. Ray Millholland is a U. S. writer who has been in close touch with the automobile industry and his comments concerning Tomorrow’s Car are closer to reality than many similar articles we have read in recent months. Edgar M. Queeny, who draws upon the autoindustry for his illustrations, contributes to our Free Enterprise vs. State Control discussion a lively and interesting article on Competition. Mr. Queeny is one of the leading industrialists in the United States, chairman of the board of the Monsanto Chemical Company.

Now internationally famous, Thomas H. Raddall is constantly surprising us with his amazing versatility in fiction. “The Pass o’ Killicrankie” is not only a grand piece of writing; it is mighty funny. And whether you can take swing music or leave it alone, “A-One-A and A-Two-A,” by Scott Corbett and Alan Lipscott, will keep you reading.

NEXT ISSUE: Yousuf Karsh,

Ottawa’s famous camera artist, has been in England making studies of great Empire personalities. Here comes the story of his experiences. Daniel Josselyn gives a warning on Fatigue. James W. Draw bell tells how Britain has waged war via radio. Dink Carroll writes of the amazing Wurtele Twins, and Blair Fraser describes Canada’s mighty aluminum industry.

Fiction by Will R. Jenkins and Nelia Gardner White. And numerous other features to fit whatever mood you may happen to enjoy at the moment. Even if you have had, are having, or feel like getting the

’flu.