WOMEN AND THE HOME

A Stitch in Time

HELEN G. CAMPBELL Director of Chatelaine Institute April 1 1944
WOMEN AND THE HOME

A Stitch in Time

HELEN G. CAMPBELL Director of Chatelaine Institute April 1 1944

A Stitch in Time

WOMEN AND THE HOME

HELEN G. CAMPBELL Director of Chatelaine Institute

FIRST step in getting good value for your stocking dollar is to spend it on the right fit. Unless your feet have grown bigger with all the walking you are doing nowadays, buy rayon hose half a size smaller than your pre-war sil kens. Get a length to suit your figure long enough to be fastened without strain, but not so long that it’s hard to keep them looking smooth and neat. Think of the weight, too; sheers are very nice for dressup occasions, hut a heavier stocking is nrmre practical for workaday wear.

It pays to buy at least two matching pairs at the same time. Then in csea of runs or rips the other stocking isn’t a dead loss; you can pair it up with either of the others and use in rotation.

Wash before wearing; this preliminary will make your hose fit better, look nicer and wear longer.

Treat gently. Before beginning to wash stockings, remove your rings especially those with prongs or sharp settings—to avoid catching threads or roughening the surface. Sharp pointed or broken fingernails are hard on rayons, particularly when wet.

Wash after each wearing as perspiration and soil weaken rayon threads. A daily dip lengthens the life and adds to the smartness of your hosiery.

To prepare the bath, make a good rich suds of mild soap and barely lukewarm water. Too warm a temperature is hard on the wearing quality of rayons and besides weakening the threads is apt to fade them.

Don't soak and don’t rub. Soaking may leave your stockings streaky and rubbing frays or roughens them. All rayon fibres lose about half their strength when wet, so gentle handling is the right technique in hosiery care. Squeeze the suds through the fabric,

then use the same squeezing motion to remove water. Never twist or wring.

Rinse thoroughly in two or three clear waters of the same lukewarm temperature. Squeeze them, then roll in a towel and pat or gently knead out the moisture. Do not leave in the towel but unroll at once.

Hang to dry over a smooth rod away from hot radiators and out of direct sunlight. Don’t use clothes pegs.

Allow from 48 to 72 hours for thorough drying. Rayon dries slowly and the fibres do not regain their full strength before then. For this reason it’s a good idea to have three pairs on the go— the one you’re wearing and the two others on the drying rod.

If you get your feet wet or your stockings spotted on a rainy day he extra careful in straightening seams or pulling them up. A stocking is no stronger than its weakest thread.

Even when hose are thoroughly dry, draw them on carefully. Roll down to the toe and slip your foot in it. Straighten the foot seam, then unroll evenly and smoothly over the leg. Remove carefully too; don’t yank them ofT. See that shoe linings are smooth and watch sharp shoe buckles.

Clasp garters to the folded-over tops. It is best to fasten the front and side ones when seated to allow for knee action and minimize strain on the material.

Remember the advantages of a stitch in time. Mend small holes at once, using yarn about the same weight or thickness as the stocking thread. The darn will look better and wear longer.

Store hose in matched pairs ready for quick selection. Divided boxes with smooth linings offer protection to your stockings and convenience in choosing the right pair for the occasion.